Recent Posts

Taking Faith in the Future! 4 Ways Religious Involvement Can Help You Age Well

Thirty-nine percent of people across the world attend a religious service every week, but of them, few know just how beneficial religious involvement can be! As life changes with aging, from physical declines to loss of loved ones, religious involvement can help you remain healthy. No matter your prior involvement or your current abilities, you can experience the benefits of religion. Here are four reasons why you should embrace your faith as a means toward healthy aging.

Why Sexualized Halloween Costumes Are Scarier Than You Think

Every year many children and adults creatively plan out their costumes for the one night where spooky wins. And even though for the most part the holiday may seem harmless it can have scarier consequences for our girls. With the acceptance of sexualized women’s costumes, the line for what’s appropriate to wear at different ages is increasingly blurred. Each Halloween, as girls get older, they are bombarded with costumes that are progressively more sexualized and socially acceptable. The question is, should this be a concern?

APA Joins Forces with the CDC Tips From Former Smokers® Campaign to Reduce Smoking Disparities

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is continuing its national tobacco education campaign—Tips From Former Smokers® (Tips®)—with hard-hitting TV commercials that feature real people who have experienced the harms caused by smoking. The 2018 campaign ads are again highlighting the immediate and long-term damage caused by smoking, and strongly encouraging smokers to quit.

The American Psychological Association (APA) is one of a cadre of national organizations partnering with the Tips® campaign.

Psychologists, Make Your Voice Heard Beyond the Ballot Box

The midterm elections are over, and we all know that voting is a vital means to make our voices heard. But it’s not the only way. Psychologists have the expertise, skills, and opportunity to engage in needed and productive advocacy to advance the issues that are important to us, both locally and nationally.

This advocacy includes meeting with elected representatives to express concerns and support for initiatives. Meeting with your representatives may seem like a daunting and intimidating task if you’ve never done it before, but APA offers useful online advocacy training, tools, and a variety of resources to help you prepare for your meetings

25 Ways Psychologists Can Work to End Poverty

Today marks the 25th anniversary of the declaration of the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty. In 2018, poverty is defined as living on an annual income of less than $12,140 for an individual and $25,100 for a family of four in the contiguous United States (US Department of Health and Human Services, 2018). While these numbers reflect Americans living in poverty as a whole, they do not adequately capture the millions living in deep poverty. Psychologists are vital to the effort of eradicating poverty – here are 25 ways they can help.

Six Essential Lessons You Learn from Working on Capitol Hill as an APA Congressional Fellow

  By Meghann Galloway, PhD & Laura Knudtson, PhD (2017-2018 APA Congressional Fellows)   Pinch me… is this a dream? Am I really here? Did I actually just ride the elevator with Bernie Sanders? Was Lisa Murkowski ahead of me in line for coffee?   The novelty of working as an APA Congressional Fellow in […]

A Good Night’s Rest is More Important Than Beauty Sleep: 5 Ways to Improve Sleep for Healthy Aging

For aging adults, declining quality of sleep and difficulty sleeping through the night are common problems. Sleep is an essential biological process, and good sleep is important to our overall mental and physical wellbeing. Researchers find that changes in circadian rhythm, the body’s internal clock for cycles like eating and sleeping, can cause changes as we age

Black Boys and Men Face Daunting Odds, Here’s How We Can Promote Their Resilience and Future Success

When my son was just eight weeks and two days into his gestational period, I settled my anxiety of giving birth to a Black male. The night before I gave birth, unlike his twin sister, he was hovered up into the corner of my womb and his heart rate had begun to slow down. That following morning, he was born. Now 20, my Black son has dreams and aspirations but there is the threat of death in the air.

How Science and Socioeconomics Impacts a Mother’s “Choice” to Breastfeed

did whatever I thought would provide the best start for my daughter and cement me as a “good mom”. And as a young 21-year-old, unmarried, Black mother I felt even more pressure to prove this to others since I knew my age, amongst other things, unfortunately said otherwise to some people. Absent the knowledge and support of any family or friends that breastfed their children, I did my research and decided to breastfeed my daughter and enrolled in WIC (Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, infants, and Children). I was doing what I was thought was best for my daughter while simultaneously, purposefully performing an act that I thought would shatter anyone’s doubt that I could be a good, competent parent.