Why Social Isolation is Bad for Us as We Age (And What We Can Do to Combat It)

The sizeable portion of older adults living alone is alarming given the harmful effects of social isolation – a reduction in social connectedness as measured by satisfaction derived from social ties – can have on the health of older people. Social isolation is associated with negative health effects including chronic health conditions, a weakened immune system, and depression and anxiety. Having services and supports in place to meet the needs of older adults living alone and experiencing the harmful effects of social isolation is vital.

[CROSS-POST] Fostering a Growth Mindset Through Culturally Responsive Teaching

When a teacher is able to instill a growth mindset in his or her students, it can help temper the impacts of poverty, and lead to a lifetime love of learning. This common goal, however, is not as easy to achieve in our urban communities when some of our children cannot see beyond their current struggles. When 80% of America’s teachers are white and 26.3 million students are of color, students have less access to role models that look like them, and have less opportunity to be empowered through their education. Limited resources limit horizons, but the influence of culturally responsive teaching is able to encourage the development of a growth mindset in our urban children, bridging the exposure gap between urban students and their more affluent peers.

Children Are Not Colorblind: 4 Ways to Talk to Young Children About Race

  This post continues our blog series regarding racial/ethnic socialization practices, programs, and approaches. APA is putting together a clearinghouse of resources to help parents/caregivers to protect youth of color and themselves from the psychological damage of discrimination and racism. For more information regarding APA’s new initiative and to provide feedback as we continue to engage […]

Depression in Black Boys Begins Earlier Than You Think

From 2001 to 2015, the suicide risk for Black boys between the ages of 5 and 11 was two to three times higher than that of White boys, according to a new research letter in JAMA Pediatrics (Bridge, 2018). This concerning trend continues through adolescence as reported by the Nationwide Youth Risk Behavior Survey (Kann et al., 2017). The rates of attempted suicide, including attempts that resulted in an injury, poisoning, or overdose, are 1.2x higher among Black males compared to White males.

Scammers are Targeting Older Adults for Financial Abuse. Do You Know What to Do?

Though there are many words for it such as conning or swindling, scamming has one clear definition: financial exploitation in a deceptive manner. Have you ever received a phone call or an email offering a free trip to some luxurious paradise, warning about your unpaid taxes, or threatening legal action if you fail to pay a fee to help your friend? With email, automated robocallers, and inexpensive international calling services, at some point or another most people will have received one or more fraudulent messages. In general, older adults are more likely to be targeted. Though new types of cons are always occurring and be used against anyone, the Department of Justice has identified some that are more likely to be directed at older adults.

The Second Anniversary of the Pulse Shooting Reminds Us Why Gun Control Matters to the LGBTQ Community

Today, we remember the 49 people lost two years ago on this day in a senseless act of gun violence during the Pulse Nightclub shooting. Most of those lost that night were young, Latinx members of the LGBTQ community simply enjoying a night out with their friends and loved ones, and yet, somehow there are still conversations going on across America questioning whether gun control should be an LGBTQ priority.

Paving the Way: Reflections on the I am Psyched for Asian Pacific Heritage Month Event

Last month, I was fortunate enough to attend the American Psychological Association’s I am Psyched! for Asian Pacific American Heritage Month event honoring prominent psychologists who are women of Asian descent. Each honoree was presented with an Inspiring History, Inspiring Lives citation by Dr. Arthur C. Evans (APA’s Chief Executive Officer) for their work towards transforming society for the better and for having broken barriers in their respective professional careers.

The Cost of Being Poor in a Warming World

f you don’t feel the impacts of climate change directly in your daily life, you probably aren’t poor.

Major news outlets regularly publish features on scientific studies by climatologists ringing the alarm on how many degrees global temperatures have increased, the rise in severity and frequency of natural disasters, and the dire future effects on the environment if human behavior does not change. However, most people aren’t climatologists or journalists. Climate change, for some folks, is an abstraction discussed over the dinner table or argued about in social media comment sections, or perhaps a notion thought about when presented with the choice of garbage or recycling bins.

After Fifty Years, Why the Poor People’s Campaign is More Relevant Than Ever

The Poor People’s Campaign (May 12, 1968 – June 24, 1968) was a national multiethnic movement that sought to gain economic justice for poor people in the United States. The campaign was in response to the shortcomings of the War on Poverty. Its impact drew attention to the crisis of poverty in America. Fifty years later, the Poor People’s Campaign is still a much-needed force for shedding light on the lives of 43 million Americans living in poverty. Psychological science has extensively documented the mental and physical health impacts of poverty over the lifespan.