Psychology Benefits Society

Applying Psychological Science, Benefiting Society

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Efua Andoh is the Asst Director, Communications and Special Projects in Public Interest. She serves as the primary administrator for the Psychology Benefits Society blog.

    The Hidden Population of Caregiving Youth in Our Schools

    As students around the country are excitedly gathering their backpacks and school supplies in anticipation of the new school year, there is another group of students who are more worried than excited…worried about the family member(s) they are caring for…”What if something happens when I am at school?” “What if people at school find out what I do…will they take me away from my family?”

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    Charlottesville and Us

    The White supremacist rally which led to the death of one counter-protestor may seem worlds away from the lives we lead in schools, non-profits, government agencies and corporations. Charlottesville represents the most extreme, virulent and lethal form of racism—a form that is repudiated by most everyone. But racism occurs along a continuum. And the far other end is anchored by everyday acts of bias and prejudice.

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    Accepting Help is Hard: Here’s Why There’s No Shame in Getting a Personal Care Assistant

    Our society places the highest value on independence; doing things by ourselves for ourselves. Because of this, we rarely think about what it would be like to need someone else’s assistance with even the most basic activities: getting dressed, brushing teeth, eating, driving, or filling out paperwork. Thus, when individuals are faced with changes in their physical abilities, the adjustment to using personal care assistance can be challenging.

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    Black Pain, Black Joy, and Racist Fear: Supporting Black Children in a Hostile World

    When it seems like Black children are mistreated for expressing anger, fear, joy, or for simply existing, it can be a daunting task to figure out how to best protect them from harm while also allowing them to live and thrive unapologetically. Here are a few things to consider from the research.

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    Beyond the “Melting Pot”: Why We Need to Support the Multicultural Identities of All America’s Children

    When we create an environment that leads children to feel ashamed of their ethnic identity, or to think that they cannot be both ethically identified and American, we are robbing them of a crucial protective factor that enhances their development. Numerous research studies have found that strong ties to cultures of origin, multilingualism, and multicultural identities provide cognitive, academic, social, and emotional advantages.

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    Jury Bias: Can You Argue the Facts When Race Enters the Mix?

    Research tells us that facts not “relevant” to a given case impact jurors’ decisions – these are called extralegal factors and range from personal characteristics like race or gender to how a juror sees others. Scientific data show, for example, Blacks are treated the worst in criminal and civil cases. Studies also show jurors’ biases about race may have something to do with their decisions –that is, their verdict. Yet, researchers don’t quite agree…

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    What’s the Secret to Combating Ageist Stereotypes? It’s Complicated

    How do we counter the negative impact of ageist stereotypes pervasive in Western society? It’s more complicated than it appears. Even embracing positive age-related stereotypes can have unintended consequences. Here’s an overview of what research suggests might really work.

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