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Can You Discipline Your Child Without Using Punishment?

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February 15, 2017

When we talk about discipline, we usually refer to the efforts by parents and teachers to reduce or eliminate annoying or inappropriate child behaviors. Punishment is designed to suppress or reduce behavior and may appear like the perfect match for these goals. The term “discipline” includes the notions of instruction but also of punishment.

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A Tale of Two Tantrums

Picture this: You are in a store. Two young children are nearby with their parents. Each of them suddenly erupts into a tantrum. Your intense irritation leads you to utter, “What those kids need is some good, old-fashioned discipline!” In that moment, you want those parents to make those children stop crying and do whatever it is that their parents have told them to do – now!

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Why Do Parents Physically Punish their Children? 5 Useful Analogies from Sedimentary Rocks

Psychologist, George Holden, shares 5 useful analogies from sedimentary rocks for why parents physically punish their children.

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Why Balanced Grandparenting is Great for Both Kids and Their Grandparents

Did you know recent research suggests taking care of your grandchildren at least once a week benefits grandparents’ overall mental health? How? You strengthen your brain by doing more mental activities that require using your memory, analyzing and managing a task in a fast pace

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How Do We Prevent Youth Violence? It Starts with Tolerance and Respect

Violence prevention, especially in relation to our youth, begins with introducing the idea of acceptance across various levels of diversity, including race, religion, gender, socioeconomic status, and more. Through tolerance, we can teach youth to respect each other and reduce feelings of indifference towards groups of different backgrounds.

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How the Federal Government Can Better Protect LGBTQ Students in Religious Universities & Colleges

This September, I met with staff members in the Office of Civil Rights, at the U.S. Department of Education (DOEd) in Washington, D.C. to talk about the risks posed to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer/questioning (LGBTQ) students by disaffirming religious universities/colleges (DRUs).

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What Can We Do to Prevent the Abuse of Children with Disabilities?

In February 2016, Ethan Okula, a 10 year-old child in foster care for three years, died from a bowel obstruction after numerous adults neglected to drive him to the hospital emergency room or call 911. In many ways, this tragedy is no surprise; Ethan embodied many known risk factors for child neglect and abuse as described by columnist Mike Newall of the Philadelphia Inquirer on July 18, 2016.

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9 Ways to Talk to Your Kids about the 15th Anniversary of September 11

Children and teens have grown up in a world changed forever by the September 11 attacks. They have little or no memory of the United States not involved in the wars which followed the attacks. Media coverage of large-scale tragedies, including coverage of anniversaries of such events, can lead to emotional stress for some children and teens. The intensive 15th anniversary coverage of the terrorist attacks of September 11 may produce such distress.

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We Need to Talk About How Race-Related Trauma Hurts Black and Brown Youth in Schools

Witnessing or experiencing race-related trauma damages the psychological wellbeing of minority youth. African American, American Indian, and Latino youth not only encounter race-related trauma in their neighborhoods but also in school. Schools should be a safe space for all children, but some disturbing data prove otherwise.

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New CDC Survey Data Confirm the Severe Health Risks LGB Youth Face

On August 11, 2016, the CDC released the results of the first national study of sexual minority high school students. These data show that LGB students experience far greater risks of violence and bullying than their heterosexual peers.

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