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Health Disparities rss

Historical Trauma in the Present: Why APA Cannot Remain Silent on the Dakota Access Pipeline

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November 16, 2016

Protesters being marked with numbers, put in dog kennels and shot with rubber bullets. These do not sound like events that should occur in modern day America. Unfortunately, according to media reports, these are some of the first-hand accounts of what is happening in North Dakota as protests escalate over the Dakota Access Pipeline.

Latinxs: Take Action to Stop HIV

October 15th is National Latinx AIDS Awareness Day, and this year’s theme is “We’ll Defeat AIDS con Ganas!” But why is it important to talk about acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in the Latino community? Latinxs are disproportionally affected by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)—the virus that causes AIDS. Our community represents 17% of the total U.S. population, but accounts for 21% of all new HIV infections and 21% of people living with HIV. In addition, research shows that Latinxs are more likely to receive late diagnosis and HIV care compared to other races and ethnicities.

“I’m Not Just Black!”: Exploring Intersections of Identity

Through a very complete body of research, the field of psychology has established that a person’s identity is composed of several different parts. However, psychological research projects often only focus on one or two aspects of identity. As we move towards a more complete picture of human behavior, we must remember to keep in mind that the intersections of identity are a vital piece of that picture.

How to Help People with Mental Health Conditions Quit Smoking for Good

Rebecca, a former smoker featured in CDC’s Tips From Former Smokers campaign, started smoking cigarettes at age 16. Everyone in her family smoked, and once she started smoking, she quickly became addicted. She kept smoking into adulthood. While she tried to stop, she had difficulty quitting. “I probably tried to quit smoking at least half a dozen times, but the addiction was so strong.”

Starting a Conversation: How We Can Reduce Health Disparities Among Older Adults

Reducing health disparities among older adults overall is a massive undertaking and managed healthcare significantly reduces time spent with patients. However, there are still small steps that providers and older adults themselves can take. Providers and older adults can talk to each other about barriers to receiving care, barriers to achieving healthier lifestyles, and their own values and beliefs.

Health and Healthcare Injustice: Why We Really Should Care About HIV Disparities

By Alyssa Arentoft, PhD (California State University, Northridge) & Monica Rivera Mindt, PhD (Fordham University & Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai) “Of all the forms of inequality, injustice in health care is the most shocking and inhumane.” – Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Perhaps nowhere are health and healthcare inequities so glaring as in HIV…. Read More ›

Professional black woman under cherry blossoms

Why Does HIV Impact African American Women Harder Than Everyone Else and What Can You Do to Help?

By Leo Rennie, MPA (Senior Legislative & Federal Affairs Officer, APA Public Interest)   February 7th marked the annual observance of National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day. The day is an opportunity to raise awareness about HIV and AIDS and to promote HIV testing in the Black community.  Sadly, 35 years into the HIV epidemic the… Read More ›

Joining with SAMHSA to Support Mental and Behavioral Health in All American Communities

By Norman. B. Anderson, PhD (CEO, American Psychological Association) Mental and behavioral health matter for all Americans.  Do all Americans have equal access to mental health care? In 2001, then U. S. Surgeon General David Satcher, MD, PhD, released his report, Mental Health: Culture, Race and Ethnicity.  The report found profound differences in access to and… Read More ›

Congregants wearing AIDS ribbons at Black church service

5 Ways Black Churches are Engaging in HIV Prevention

By Terrinieka Williams Powell, PhD (Assistant Professor, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) The CDC notes that African Americans have the most severe burden of HIV of all racial/ethnic groups in the United States. Despite accounting for less than 15% of the U.S. population, African Americans account for nearly half of all new… Read More ›

Latex gloves and medical mask with Ebola sign

Ebola, Thomas Duncan’s Death, and the Biopolitics of Disposability

By Akhenaten B.S. Tankwanchi, PhD Although the word Ebola percolated into the American public consciousness over two decades ago owing to an Ebola outbreak in a Washington, DC suburb, it was not until Liberian citizen Thomas Eric Duncan, died from the disease, on October 8, 2014 in Dallas, Texas, that concerns about the spread of… Read More ›

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