A Dream Deferred: Reflections on the 50th Anniversary of the Kerner Commission Report

March 2018 marked the 50th anniversary of the Kerner Commission Report (1968), which investigated the causes of race riots in U.S. cities in the mid-1960s. This groundbreaking federal study raised awareness of the negative effects of segregation and discrimination on black urban communities.

5 Ways to Teach Your Students about World Poverty

I teach about issues of economic justice in many of my classes, but this is the first year that I will formally observe what is also known as World Poverty Day. As I was brainstorming different ways to teach about poverty across the globe, I realized it would be beneficial to enlist the assistance of two undergraduate students. Together we developed this list of resources and activities.

Food Stamp Cuts May Put 1 Million More Americans At Risk of Hunger: What We Can Do About It

By Sara Buckingham, MA (Public Interest Policy Scholar, APA Public Interest Government Relations Office)   How do you decide between heating your apartment, purchasing lifesaving medication, and eating? As of April 1, up to 1 million more Americans will face that decision.   Who is affected by hunger? Nearly 50 million Americans – including one […]

Penalizing the Poor and Homeless: Psychology’s Contribution

By Maha Khalid (Program Coordinator, Office on Socioeconomic Status) “Poverty is not an accident. Like slavery and apartheid, it is man-made and can be removed by the actions of human beings.” – Nelson Mandela Communities across the country respond to poverty and homelessness with a variety of programs: food banks, emergency shelters, transitional housing, and […]

Is the Minimum Wage a Psychological Matter? (Spoiler Alert: Yes)

By Gabriel Twose (Senior Legislative and Federal Affairs Officer, APA Public Interest Government Relations Office) Do you think that the field of psychology has anything to say about the minimum wage?  In a recent article in American Psychologist, Laura Smith of Columbia University argues that psychology has much to contribute.  Psychological research contributes to our understanding […]

National Adjunct Walkout Day protester

Adjunct Faculty: Highly Educated, Working Hard for Society, and Struggling To Survive

By Gretchen M. Reevy, PhD (Lecturer, Psychology Department, California State University, East Bay) When we think of people who live below the poverty line in the U.S., we often picture individuals who lack adequate medical care, who are homeless, who are unable to provide nutritious food for themselves and their families, and if young, people who […]

We Need to Talk about Money: How Ignoring Socioeconomic Status Hurts Research

By Meagan Sweeney, MA (Graduate Intern, APA Office of Socioeconomic Status) There is a social convention to not talk about money. We consider it rude to discuss differences in income, education, or spending ability, even among our close friends. While that rule of thumb may work at the family dinner table or office water cooler, […]