Depression in Black Boys Begins Earlier Than You Think

From 2001 to 2015, the suicide risk for Black boys between the ages of 5 and 11 was two to three times higher than that of White boys, according to a new research letter in JAMA Pediatrics (Bridge, 2018). This concerning trend continues through adolescence as reported by the Nationwide Youth Risk Behavior Survey (Kann et al., 2017). The rates of attempted suicide, including attempts that resulted in an injury, poisoning, or overdose, are 1.2x higher among Black males compared to White males.

The Cost of Being Poor in a Warming World

f you don’t feel the impacts of climate change directly in your daily life, you probably aren’t poor.

Major news outlets regularly publish features on scientific studies by climatologists ringing the alarm on how many degrees global temperatures have increased, the rise in severity and frequency of natural disasters, and the dire future effects on the environment if human behavior does not change. However, most people aren’t climatologists or journalists. Climate change, for some folks, is an abstraction discussed over the dinner table or argued about in social media comment sections, or perhaps a notion thought about when presented with the choice of garbage or recycling bins.

After Fifty Years, Why the Poor People’s Campaign is More Relevant Than Ever

The Poor People’s Campaign (May 12, 1968 – June 24, 1968) was a national multiethnic movement that sought to gain economic justice for poor people in the United States. The campaign was in response to the shortcomings of the War on Poverty. Its impact drew attention to the crisis of poverty in America. Fifty years later, the Poor People’s Campaign is still a much-needed force for shedding light on the lives of 43 million Americans living in poverty. Psychological science has extensively documented the mental and physical health impacts of poverty over the lifespan.

A Dream Deferred: Reflections on the 50th Anniversary of the Kerner Commission Report

March 2018 marked the 50th anniversary of the Kerner Commission Report (1968), which investigated the causes of race riots in U.S. cities in the mid-1960s. This groundbreaking federal study raised awareness of the negative effects of segregation and discrimination on black urban communities.

5 Ways to Teach Your Students about World Poverty

I teach about issues of economic justice in many of my classes, but this is the first year that I will formally observe what is also known as World Poverty Day. As I was brainstorming different ways to teach about poverty across the globe, I realized it would be beneficial to enlist the assistance of two undergraduate students. Together we developed this list of resources and activities.

Food Stamp Cuts May Put 1 Million More Americans At Risk of Hunger: What We Can Do About It

By Sara Buckingham, MA (Public Interest Policy Scholar, APA Public Interest Government Relations Office)   How do you decide between heating your apartment, purchasing lifesaving medication, and eating? As of April 1, up to 1 million more Americans will face that decision.   Who is affected by hunger? Nearly 50 million Americans – including one […]

Penalizing the Poor and Homeless: Psychology’s Contribution

By Maha Khalid (Program Coordinator, Office on Socioeconomic Status) “Poverty is not an accident. Like slavery and apartheid, it is man-made and can be removed by the actions of human beings.” – Nelson Mandela Communities across the country respond to poverty and homelessness with a variety of programs: food banks, emergency shelters, transitional housing, and […]

Is the Minimum Wage a Psychological Matter? (Spoiler Alert: Yes)

By Gabriel Twose (Senior Legislative and Federal Affairs Officer, APA Public Interest Government Relations Office) Do you think that the field of psychology has anything to say about the minimum wage?  In a recent article in American Psychologist, Laura Smith of Columbia University argues that psychology has much to contribute.  Psychological research contributes to our understanding […]