Applying Psychological Science, Benefiting Society

Public Policy rss

“All Politics is Local”: 5 Simple Tips for Becoming a Better Advocate

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May 10, 2017

Interest in our political process has dramatically increased across the U.S. since the last election. People want accountability from their elected representatives and are ready to engage on complex issues such as health care coverage, immigration, and tax reform. The demand for grassroots advocacy training has grown along with this increased engagement. Here are some tips to help you get started.

“We Are One Tribe”: Fighting Forward Toward an AIDS-Free Generation

I was granted the opportunity to attend “Moving Forward with HIV in America: Drawing Strength from Our Past and Empowering Today’s Leaders”, the Office of National AIDS Policy’s final public event during the Obama Administration to help mark World AIDS Day 2016. It was truly an honor to share space in the South Court Auditorium with so many advocates and impactful leaders working to eradicate HIV/AIDS.

For Richer or Poorer: What Works to Reduce Poverty in America?

How can we improve the economic wellbeing of American families? This was one of the issues that dominated the 2016 election cycle, with each candidate proposing a different way forward. Across party lines, we can all agree that poverty is harmful for our society.

Food Stamp Cuts May Put 1 Million More Americans At Risk of Hunger: What We Can Do About It

By Sara Buckingham, MA (Public Interest Policy Scholar, APA Public Interest Government Relations Office)   How do you decide between heating your apartment, purchasing lifesaving medication, and eating? As of April 1, up to 1 million more Americans will face that decision.   Who is affected by hunger? Nearly 50 million Americans – including one… Read More ›

No Progress, No Change: HIV Funding Stagnant for Third Year in a Row

By Sarah J. Javier, MS (PhD Candidate in Health Psychology at Virginia Commonwealth University) On February 9, President Obama released his proposed budget for FY 2017. The $4 trillion budget included several provisions for research on clean energy, education, and Medicaid. However, for advocates of HIV/AIDS research, one thing was startlingly clear: HIV/AIDS is fast… Read More ›

“Don’t Believe the Hype”: 4 Reasons to Doubt That Most Mass Shooters are Mentally Ill

By Joel Dvoskin, PhD, ABPP (Chair, Nevada Behavioral Health and Wellness Council) Too often, even the most well-intentioned among us believe that most mass shootings are carried out by those with untreated mental illness. As a forensic and clinical psychologist with extensive experience treating individuals with serious mental illness, and as a member of APA’s… Read More ›

Three Year Olds Defending Themselves in Immigration Court: Absurd Joke or Sad Reality?

By Jodi A. Quas, PhD (Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior, University of California, Irvine) Recently , an amazing statement was made by a high-level federal immigration judge who not only oversees hundreds of immigration hearings each year, but is also responsible for training other immigration judges. The statement was made during a deposition hearing regarding… Read More ›

What Do We Need to Know About the Health of Older LGBT Adults? NIH Greenlights New Research

By Mark Brennan-Ing, PhD (Director for Research and Evaluation at ACRIA, Center on HIV and Aging ) When we talk about fully including lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals in society, marriage equality and broader civil rights protections dominate our discourse. However, equally important are the numerous health disparities they experience in later life… Read More ›

Depression Screening Works and Now It Can Work for Pregnant and Postpartum Women

By Amalia Corby-Edwards, MS (Senior Legislative and Federal Affairs Officer, APA Public Interest Directorate) You may not have heard much about this, but something just happened that could positively impact millions of women and their families. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) just included pregnant and postpartum women in the new depression screening guidelines. … Read More ›

Penalizing the Poor and Homeless: Psychology’s Contribution

By Maha Khalid (Program Coordinator, Office on Socioeconomic Status) “Poverty is not an accident. Like slavery and apartheid, it is man-made and can be removed by the actions of human beings.” – Nelson Mandela Communities across the country respond to poverty and homelessness with a variety of programs: food banks, emergency shelters, transitional housing, and… Read More ›

Contact

American Psychological Association
Public Interest Directorate
750 First Street, NE
Washington, DC 20002-4242
Phone: (202) 336-6056
Email: publicinterest@apa.org