Psychology Benefits Society

Applying Psychological Science, Benefiting Society

Public Policy

“All Politics is Local”: 5 Simple Tips for Becoming a Better Advocate

Interest in our political process has dramatically increased across the U.S. since the last election. People want accountability from their elected representatives and are ready to engage on complex issues such as health care coverage, immigration, and tax reform. The demand for grassroots advocacy training has grown along with this increased engagement. Here are some tips to help you get started.

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“We Are One Tribe”: Fighting Forward Toward an AIDS-Free Generation

I was granted the opportunity to attend “Moving Forward with HIV in America: Drawing Strength from Our Past and Empowering Today’s Leaders”, the Office of National AIDS Policy’s final public event during the Obama Administration to help mark World AIDS Day 2016. It was truly an honor to share space in the South Court Auditorium with so many advocates and impactful leaders working to eradicate HIV/AIDS.

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Food Stamp Cuts May Put 1 Million More Americans At Risk of Hunger: What We Can Do About It

By Sara Buckingham, MA (Public Interest Policy Scholar, APA Public Interest Government Relations Office)   How do you decide between heating your apartment, purchasing lifesaving medication, and eating? As of April 1, up to 1 million more Americans will face that decision.   Who is affected by hunger? Nearly 50 million Americans – including one of every five children – are at risk of going hungry (Coleman-Jensen, Rabbitt, Gregory, & […]

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No Progress, No Change: HIV Funding Stagnant for Third Year in a Row

By Sarah J. Javier, MS (PhD Candidate in Health Psychology at Virginia Commonwealth University) On February 9, President Obama released his proposed budget for FY 2017. The $4 trillion budget included several provisions for research on clean energy, education, and Medicaid. However, for advocates of HIV/AIDS research, one thing was startlingly clear: HIV/AIDS is fast becoming an insignificant issue in Congress. There are over 1.1 million people in the United […]

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“Don’t Believe the Hype”: 4 Reasons to Doubt That Most Mass Shooters are Mentally Ill

  By Joel Dvoskin, PhD, ABPP (Chair, Nevada Behavioral Health and Wellness Council) Too often, even the most well-intentioned among us believe that most mass shootings are carried out by those with untreated mental illness. As a forensic and clinical psychologist with extensive experience treating individuals with serious mental illness, and as a member of APA’s Policy Review Task Force on the Prediction and Prevention of Gun Violence, I believe this […]

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