A Good Night’s Rest is More Important Than Beauty Sleep: 5 Ways to Improve Sleep for Healthy Aging

For aging adults, declining quality of sleep and difficulty sleeping through the night are common problems. Sleep is an essential biological process, and good sleep is important to our overall mental and physical wellbeing. Researchers find that changes in circadian rhythm, the body’s internal clock for cycles like eating and sleeping, can cause changes as we age

Black Boys and Men Face Daunting Odds, Here’s How We Can Promote Their Resilience and Future Success

When my son was just eight weeks and two days into his gestational period, I settled my anxiety of giving birth to a Black male. The night before I gave birth, unlike his twin sister, he was hovered up into the corner of my womb and his heart rate had begun to slow down. That following morning, he was born. Now 20, my Black son has dreams and aspirations but there is the threat of death in the air.

Depression in Black Boys Begins Earlier Than You Think

From 2001 to 2015, the suicide risk for Black boys between the ages of 5 and 11 was two to three times higher than that of White boys, according to a new research letter in JAMA Pediatrics (Bridge, 2018). This concerning trend continues through adolescence as reported by the Nationwide Youth Risk Behavior Survey (Kann et al., 2017). The rates of attempted suicide, including attempts that resulted in an injury, poisoning, or overdose, are 1.2x higher among Black males compared to White males.

3 Simple Psychological Strategies You Can Use to Help Prevent Against Stroke

By Ryan C. Thompson & Rowena Gomez, PhD (Palo Alto University) Improving physical health behaviors, such as eating healthy and exercise, is not the only way to protect older adults from stroke. In fact, psychological factors have been shown to play a role in increasing as well as reducing the risk of stroke. For example, […]

Does Fatigue Among U.S. Workers Contribute to a Lackluster Post-“Great Recession” Come-back?

By Bengt B. Arnetz, MD, PhD, MScEpi, MPH (Professor of Family and Preventive Medicine and Chair, Department of Family Medicine, College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University) The recovery after the “Great Recession” in terms of high-quality jobs and economic growth has been slow. This is usually attributed to economic reasons. However, I believe a major […]

Conferences as Community Builders

This is a cross-post from Minding the Workplace (the New Workplace Institute blog). Professor David Yamada reflects on his experiences at the recent Work, Stress and Health conference in Atlanta, GA. By David Yamada, JD (Professor of Law, Suffolk University Boston and Director, New Workplace Institute) All too often, academic and professional conferences are something of a […]