Stop the Abuse: Why We Can’t Neglect Women with Disabilities When We Talk about Interpersonal Violence

The #MeToo movement has elevated the conversation about women and violence. However, there is one population that often gets neglected from that conversation: women with disabilities. How prevalent is interpersonal violence in women with disabilities?
Women with disabilities have higher rates of experiencing interpersonal violence (e.g., physical violence, rape/sexual violence, stalking, psychological aggression, and control of sexual/reproductive health) than women without disabilities.

[CROSS-POST] Action or Inaction in the Wake of the Parkland Florida Tragedy? Preventing Gun Violence Through Model Legislation

This blog post is cross-posted from Community Psychology, the Society for Community Research and Action’s blog. SCRA is Division 27 of the American Psychological Association. By Christopher Corbett, MA (APA Division 27 Member) Introduction As the nation reels from another mass shooting that has killed at least 17 people and injured at least 15 more […]

Hit, Hurt, and Distressed: How Violence and Trauma Put Women at Risk of Incarceration

Feminist pathways theorists argue that women and girls have different risk factors then men for entry into the criminal justice system. In particular, there is growing recognition that incarcerated women experience high rates of interpersonal violence (IPV) and that their exposure is often repeated and includes multiple forms of violence.

Depression in Black Boys Begins Earlier Than You Think

From 2001 to 2015, the suicide risk for Black boys between the ages of 5 and 11 was two to three times higher than that of White boys, according to a new research letter in JAMA Pediatrics (Bridge, 2018). This concerning trend continues through adolescence as reported by the Nationwide Youth Risk Behavior Survey (Kann et al., 2017). The rates of attempted suicide, including attempts that resulted in an injury, poisoning, or overdose, are 1.2x higher among Black males compared to White males.

The Second Anniversary of the Pulse Shooting Reminds Us Why Gun Control Matters to the LGBTQ Community

Today, we remember the 49 people lost two years ago on this day in a senseless act of gun violence during the Pulse Nightclub shooting. Most of those lost that night were young, Latinx members of the LGBTQ community simply enjoying a night out with their friends and loved ones, and yet, somehow there are still conversations going on across America questioning whether gun control should be an LGBTQ priority.

Don’t Blame Mental Illness for Our Nation’s Gun Violence Epidemic

After every mass shooting, politicians mindlessly follow the lead of the NRA and call for mental health reform as a panacea for gun violence. This approach to reducing gun deaths is based on the assertion that people with serious mental illness (SMI) pose a special risk of gun violence. This inaccurate myth has serious harmful consequences, as it contributes mightily to the stigma already endured by people with SMI in America.

How to Listen When Someone You Know Discloses Sexual Harassment or Assault

Every day now in the news, we learn of various actions taken by those facing allegations of sexual assault and harassment. One set of actions has to do with their reported sexual harassment and/or assaults. Another set of actions has to do with how they respond when accused. Both types of action are crucially important. A good response can at least do some good (sincere apologies can be healing). But a bad response not only exacerbates the harm of the first injury, it also inflicts new injury, and does so in ways that are usually public and ongoing (well past the media moving on).

Woman consoling teenage girl

What is One Simple Thing You Can Do to Prevent Gun Violence at School? Say Something

Say Something Week empowers children to help others and prevent tragedies. They are taught to ‘Say Something’ to a trusted adult to prevent a friend from harming themselves or others. This programing has the potential to save lives in the communities it reaches. Though it is a daunting task to ensure that no student ever has to go to school in fear, campaigns such as Say Something Week can work with schools and youth programs to maximize their safety, learning, and potential.

Are You Talking to Parents About Keeping Guns Away from Children? 5 Reasons You Absolutely Should

Did you know that 1 in 3 homes with kids has a gun, many unlocked and loaded? June 21 is ASK (Asking Saves Kids) Day – a national observance that reminds health professionals, parents, and caregivers about the importance of asking if there are unlocked guns in the homes where children live and play. Although the conversation may be awkward, having it could potentially save a child’s life. Here are five reasons why psychologists should talk to their patients about gun safety.

[RE-POST] #WearOrange: The One Simple Thing You Can Do to Address Gun Violence

The financial cost of gun violence in the United States was an estimated $229 billion in 2012; this amount does not account for the psychological toll on those directly or indirectly affected by firearm violence–those who witness or fear firearm violence in their homes or communities or who are left behind when a loved one dies by suicide.