Applying Psychological Science, Benefiting Society

Violence rss

We Lose Too Many Vietnam Veterans to Suicide: Here’s How You Can Help

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March 29, 2017

As our Vietnam veteran population ages, many may become increasingly vulnerable for death by suicide. Despite the fact that the Vietnam war occurred approximately 40 years ago, the moral injuries sustained are still felt by many who served our country.

How Do We Prevent Youth Violence? It Starts with Tolerance and Respect

Violence prevention, especially in relation to our youth, begins with introducing the idea of acceptance across various levels of diversity, including race, religion, gender, socioeconomic status, and more. Through tolerance, we can teach youth to respect each other and reduce feelings of indifference towards groups of different backgrounds.

How Can We Help Survivors of Domestic Violence Struggling with Homelessness?

It is an unfortunate reality that many women and children who are able to escape their abuser end up homeless. A recent survey found that 17 percent of cities cited domestic violence as the primary cause of family homelessness (U.S. Conference of Mayors, 2014). This prevalent issue is something that many people do not realize is happening.

Racial Trauma is Real: The Impact of Police Shootings on African Americans

There have been many changes within the criminal justice system as a means to deter crime and to keep citizens safe. However, research demonstrates that often times men of color are treated harshly which leads to negative perceptions of police officers. The recent shootings in Baton Rouge, Falcon Heights, and Dallas have exposed many individuals and their families to incidents of police brutality that reminds us that as a society work needs to be done to improve police and community relations.

Diverse kids holding hands

How to Talk to Our Kids about the Tragic Shootings in Louisiana, Minnesota and Dallas

Families around the country are coming together to talk about the officer-involved shootings in Louisiana, Minnesota, and the ambush of police officers in Dallas, Texas. These events come shortly after the violence in Orlando. In fact, it seems that acts of violence are in the news on a regular basis. How do we begin to explain all of this to our children when we, as adults, are having our own difficulties with what is occurring?

100+ Resources for the Aftermath of the Orlando Mass Shooting Tragedy

On June 12, 2016 rapid gunfire tore through Orlando’s Pulse gay nightclub in an act of violence that jarred the nation—and garnered global attention. How could this happen? What can I do? How can I cope? Where do we go from here? No one perspective and no single resource can address each of these inquiries. Fortunately, in the time since the attack, a number of online resources, articles, and videos—some old, and many new—have circulated in relation to the event and its aftermath.

Firearm Violence Prevention is a Human Rights Issue

By Susan H. McDaniel, PhD (APA President) and Cynthia D. Belar, PhD (APA Interim CEO) June 28 is the anniversary of the Stonewall riots, which launched lesbian and gay rights as a mass movement and is commemorated in the LGBT Pride celebrations. We take this occasion to reaffirm the American Psychological Association’s commitment to removing… Read More ›

Changing Rape Culture on Campus: Can the Stanford Case Move the Needle?

The Stanford rape case encapsulates all that we know about rape culture—including victim blaming and basing excuses on alcohol – and underscores the need for coordinated efforts. We need nothing less than an elimination of rape culture and each of us has a role to play.

Responding to the Tragedy in Orlando: Helpful Responses for LGBTQ People and Allies

What took place in Orlando on the morning of June 12, 2016 was a hate crime and an act of terror. This event, despite its horror, will not stop the movement for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer rights. Here is what we know can help based on over two decades of research.

7 Ways to Talk to Children and Youth about the Shootings in Orlando

Once again our nation is coping with a violent tragedy. In the aftermath of the Orlando terrorist attack, we find ourselves distressed, grief-stricken, and even angry that such a horrible thing could happen. Children and teens may find the event even more challenging. Here are some suggestions on talking with your children about what happened.

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