Why Sexualized Halloween Costumes Are Scarier Than You Think

Every year many children and adults creatively plan out their costumes for the one night where spooky wins. And even though for the most part the holiday may seem harmless it can have scarier consequences for our girls. With the acceptance of sexualized women’s costumes, the line for what’s appropriate to wear at different ages is increasingly blurred. Each Halloween, as girls get older, they are bombarded with costumes that are progressively more sexualized and socially acceptable. The question is, should this be a concern?

How Science and Socioeconomics Impacts a Mother’s “Choice” to Breastfeed

did whatever I thought would provide the best start for my daughter and cement me as a “good mom”. And as a young 21-year-old, unmarried, Black mother I felt even more pressure to prove this to others since I knew my age, amongst other things, unfortunately said otherwise to some people. Absent the knowledge and support of any family or friends that breastfed their children, I did my research and decided to breastfeed my daughter and enrolled in WIC (Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, infants, and Children). I was doing what I was thought was best for my daughter while simultaneously, purposefully performing an act that I thought would shatter anyone’s doubt that I could be a good, competent parent.

Stop the Abuse: Why We Can’t Neglect Women with Disabilities When We Talk about Interpersonal Violence

The #MeToo movement has elevated the conversation about women and violence. However, there is one population that often gets neglected from that conversation: women with disabilities. How prevalent is interpersonal violence in women with disabilities?
Women with disabilities have higher rates of experiencing interpersonal violence (e.g., physical violence, rape/sexual violence, stalking, psychological aggression, and control of sexual/reproductive health) than women without disabilities.

What Can We Do to Combat the Maternal Mortality Crisis Affecting Black Women in America?

Alarmingly, maternal mortality rates for women living in the U.S. are the highest in the developed world with stark racial disparities. Black women specifically have the highest maternal mortality rate in the U.S. and are nearly four times more likely to die from pregnancy-related causes compared to White women.

Hit, Hurt, and Distressed: How Violence and Trauma Put Women at Risk of Incarceration

Feminist pathways theorists argue that women and girls have different risk factors then men for entry into the criminal justice system. In particular, there is growing recognition that incarcerated women experience high rates of interpersonal violence (IPV) and that their exposure is often repeated and includes multiple forms of violence.

Paving the Way: Reflections on the I am Psyched for Asian Pacific Heritage Month Event

Last month, I was fortunate enough to attend the American Psychological Association’s I am Psyched! for Asian Pacific American Heritage Month event honoring prominent psychologists who are women of Asian descent. Each honoree was presented with an Inspiring History, Inspiring Lives citation by Dr. Arthur C. Evans (APA’s Chief Executive Officer) for their work towards transforming society for the better and for having broken barriers in their respective professional careers.

Paving the Way: Dr. Regina Kimbrough

Welcome to our new blogspace, We’re Psyched! – the purpose of this space is for undergraduates, graduate students and post-docs to share engaging topics surrounding new research, current social issues and timely thinkpieces related to women of color in the field.   By Janicia Dugas (4th Year School Psychology Doctoral Student, Howard University) I’m psyched […]

This is What Psychology Looks Like: Dr. Celeste Malone

As a current student in the school psychology program at Howard University. Dr. Malone has served as an instructor and advisor to me over the last three years. She is an assistant professor and coordinator for the school psychology program. In this role she has guided many students in their pursuit of finding their passion in school psychology related research.

How Can We Help Survivors of Domestic Violence Struggling with Homelessness?

It is an unfortunate reality that many women and children who are able to escape their abuser end up homeless. A recent survey found that 17 percent of cities cited domestic violence as the primary cause of family homelessness (U.S. Conference of Mayors, 2014). This prevalent issue is something that many people do not realize is happening.