Recent Posts

Charlottesville and Us

The White supremacist rally which led to the death of one counter-protestor may seem worlds away from the lives we lead in schools, non-profits, government agencies and corporations. Charlottesville represents the most extreme, virulent and lethal form of racism—a form that is repudiated by most everyone. But racism occurs along a continuum. And the far other end is anchored by everyday acts of bias and prejudice.

Accepting Help is Hard: Here’s Why There’s No Shame in Getting a Personal Care Assistant

Our society places the highest value on independence; doing things by ourselves for ourselves. Because of this, we rarely think about what it would be like to need someone else’s assistance with even the most basic activities: getting dressed, brushing teeth, eating, driving, or filling out paperwork. Thus, when individuals are faced with changes in their physical abilities, the adjustment to using personal care assistance can be challenging.

Black Pain, Black Joy, and Racist Fear: Supporting Black Children in a Hostile World

When it seems like Black children are mistreated for expressing anger, fear, joy, or for simply existing, it can be a daunting task to figure out how to best protect them from harm while also allowing them to live and thrive unapologetically. Here are a few things to consider from the research.

Beyond the “Melting Pot”: Why We Need to Support the Multicultural Identities of All America’s Children

When we create an environment that leads children to feel ashamed of their ethnic identity, or to think that they cannot be both ethically identified and American, we are robbing them of a crucial protective factor that enhances their development. Numerous research studies have found that strong ties to cultures of origin, multilingualism, and multicultural identities provide cognitive, academic, social, and emotional advantages.

Jury Bias: Can You Argue the Facts When Race Enters the Mix?

Research tells us that facts not “relevant” to a given case impact jurors’ decisions – these are called extralegal factors and range from personal characteristics like race or gender to how a juror sees others. Scientific data show, for example, Blacks are treated the worst in criminal and civil cases. Studies also show jurors’ biases about race may have something to do with their decisions –that is, their verdict. Yet, researchers don’t quite agree…

“But Daddy, Why Was He Shot?”: How to Talk to Children about Race Today

This is the first in a series of blog posts that the American Psychological Association (APA) will publish regarding racial/ethnic socialization practices, programs, and approaches. APA is putting together a clearinghouse of resources to help parents/caregivers to protect youth of color and themselves from the psychological damage of discrimination and racism.

Kickstart a Lifelong Healthy Habit this Summer! 4 Reasons Gardening Benefits Your Health as You Age

Gardening is a popular summer activity for a reason! Research shows that it can have positive effects on our physical, mental, and social well-being as we age. Gardening can range from caring for a single plant to mowing the lawn or planting an entire vegetable garden. Don’t be intimidated. Given the versatility of gardening options, anyone can do it. It’s not too late to dig into gardening this summer!

Are You Talking to Parents About Keeping Guns Away from Children? 5 Reasons You Absolutely Should

Did you know that 1 in 3 homes with kids has a gun, many unlocked and loaded? June 21 is ASK (Asking Saves Kids) Day – a national observance that reminds health professionals, parents, and caregivers about the importance of asking if there are unlocked guns in the homes where children live and play. Although the conversation may be awkward, having it could potentially save a child’s life. Here are five reasons why psychologists should talk to their patients about gun safety.

[RE-POST] #WearOrange: The One Simple Thing You Can Do to Address Gun Violence

The financial cost of gun violence in the United States was an estimated $229 billion in 2012; this amount does not account for the psychological toll on those directly or indirectly affected by firearm violence–those who witness or fear firearm violence in their homes or communities or who are left behind when a loved one dies by suicide.