Psychology Benefits Society

Applying Psychological Science, Benefiting Society

Tag Archive for ‘african american’

How Black Boys Turn Blue: The Effects of Masculine Ideology on Same-Gender Loving Men

They say, “Black boys turn blue in the moonlight”. In the Oscar winning movie Moonlight, the story follows character Chiron as he develops into a man. What’s interesting about Chiron’s story is that it mirrors that of countless other African American men. Chiron is simply not allowed to “be” – he’s bullied for being “Little,” beaten because of his demeanor, and denied the opportunity to safely and freely explore his sexuality. It is indeed under this distress that Black boys turn blue.

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Why Does HIV Impact African American Women Harder Than Everyone Else and What Can You Do to Help?

Professional black woman under cherry blossoms

By Leo Rennie, MPA (Senior Legislative & Federal Affairs Officer, APA Public Interest)   February 7th marked the annual observance of National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day. The day is an opportunity to raise awareness about HIV and AIDS and to promote HIV testing in the Black community.  Sadly, 35 years into the HIV epidemic the need for education and community mobilization remains significant.  Nearly half of the 50,000 people who […]

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The Mad and Unhappy Place of Public Education for Black and Brown Children in the United States

By Dawn X. Henderson, PhD (Assistant Professor of Psychology, Winston-Salem State University) Some of the lines in the classic 1982 song, Mad World, capture the lived experience of many black and brown children in the public school system in the United States. When people run in circles, it’s a very very mad world… Children waiting for the day they feel good… Made to feel the way that every child should, sit […]

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What Makes People Gay (An Update), Ending Solitary Confinement in California Prisons – In Case You Missed It – September 1, 2015

In Case You Missed It

Welcome back to In Case You Missed It (our weekly roundup of articles touching on psychology, health, mental health and social justice issues from multiple news and commentary websites). This week, we address the advances over a decade of sexual orientation research, the impact of post-Katrina recovery policies on Black women in public housing, an end to solitary confinement in California prisons and more. What makes people gay? (An update) In a return 10 […]

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In Case You Missed It – May 22, 2015 – Racial double standard in Waco coverage, suicide increases in Black children

In Case You Missed It

In this week’s In Case You Missed It (a roundup of articles related to psychology, health, mental health and social justice collated from multiple news and commentary websites) we cover the racial double standard in media coverage of the Waco shooting compared with Baltimore, launching of a new Police Data Initiative, the sharp increase in suicide rates among Black children and more. Make sure to also check out these APA publications: Monitor on Psychology […]

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In Case You Missed It – April 24, 2015

In Case You Missed It

Welcome to In Case You Missed It, a weekly roundup of news articles related to issues of psychology, health and mental health, social justice and the public interest that you may be interested in. We collate these articles from multiple news and commentary websites. This week we look at stories covering new research on mixed-income housing, the debate over parenting by same-sex couples, the disappearance of 1.5 million African American men […]

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5 Ways Black Churches are Engaging in HIV Prevention

Congregants wearing AIDS ribbons at Black church service

By Terrinieka Williams Powell, PhD (Assistant Professor, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) The CDC notes that African Americans have the most severe burden of HIV of all racial/ethnic groups in the United States. Despite accounting for less than 15% of the U.S. population, African Americans account for nearly half of all new HIV infections. Because many people turn to churches for guidance and spiritual support, could Black […]

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