Psychologists, Make Your Voice Heard Beyond the Ballot Box

The midterm elections are over, and we all know that voting is a vital means to make our voices heard. But it’s not the only way. Psychologists have the expertise, skills, and opportunity to engage in needed and productive advocacy to advance the issues that are important to us, both locally and nationally.

This advocacy includes meeting with elected representatives to express concerns and support for initiatives. Meeting with your representatives may seem like a daunting and intimidating task if you’ve never done it before, but APA offers useful online advocacy training, tools, and a variety of resources to help you prepare for your meetings

Six Essential Lessons You Learn from Working on Capitol Hill as an APA Congressional Fellow

  By Meghann Galloway, PhD & Laura Knudtson, PhD (2017-2018 APA Congressional Fellows)   Pinch me… is this a dream? Am I really here? Did I actually just ride the elevator with Bernie Sanders? Was Lisa Murkowski ahead of me in line for coffee?   The novelty of working as an APA Congressional Fellow in […]

Police tape saying "police line do not cross"

The Need for Meaningful Policy Change: The More Things Change, the More They Stay the Same

Last year, APA celebrated its Congressional Fellowship Program’s 40 years of success on Capitol Hill. The article below by a former APA Congressional Fellow highlights the contribution of psychologists to public policy and of the Fellowship experience to Fellows’ professional development. Heather E. Bullock, PhD (Professor of Psychology, University of California – Santa Cruz) As we approach […]