Applying Psychological Science, Benefiting Society

Tag: children’s mental health

3 Essential Tips to Help All Kids to Embrace Their Race and Ethnicity

It is important that we talk about race-ethnicity with children – all children. A recent ethnic-racial identity intervention study provided an opportunity for teenagers to explore their culture and develop a clearer sense of what their ethnicity-race meant to them. Participating had positive effects on youth from all racial-ethnic backgrounds.

Woman consoling teenage girl

What is One Simple Thing You Can Do to Prevent Gun Violence at School? Say Something

Say Something Week empowers children to help others and prevent tragedies. They are taught to ‘Say Something’ to a trusted adult to prevent a friend from harming themselves or others. This programing has the potential to save lives in the communities it reaches. Though it is a daunting task to ensure that no student ever has to go to school in fear, campaigns such as Say Something Week can work with schools and youth programs to maximize their safety, learning, and potential.

Black Pain, Black Joy, and Racist Fear: Supporting Black Children in a Hostile World

When it seems like Black children are mistreated for expressing anger, fear, joy, or for simply existing, it can be a daunting task to figure out how to best protect them from harm while also allowing them to live and thrive unapologetically. Here are a few things to consider from the research.

Beyond the “Melting Pot”: Why We Need to Support the Multicultural Identities of All America’s Children

When we create an environment that leads children to feel ashamed of their ethnic identity, or to think that they cannot be both ethically identified and American, we are robbing them of a crucial protective factor that enhances their development. Numerous research studies have found that strong ties to cultures of origin, multilingualism, and multicultural identities provide cognitive, academic, social, and emotional advantages.

“But Daddy, Why Was He Shot?”: How to Talk to Children about Race Today

This is the first in a series of blog posts that the American Psychological Association (APA) will publish regarding racial/ethnic socialization practices, programs, and approaches. APA is putting together a clearinghouse of resources to help parents/caregivers to protect youth of color and themselves from the psychological damage of discrimination and racism.

Are You Talking to Parents About Keeping Guns Away from Children? 5 Reasons You Absolutely Should

Did you know that 1 in 3 homes with kids has a gun, many unlocked and loaded? June 21 is ASK (Asking Saves Kids) Day – a national observance that reminds health professionals, parents, and caregivers about the importance of asking if there are unlocked guns in the homes where children live and play. Although the conversation may be awkward, having it could potentially save a child’s life. Here are five reasons why psychologists should talk to their patients about gun safety.

[CROSS-POST] Put Aside What We Don’t Know and Support Justice-Involved Youth with Mental Health Needs

We need to be careful about the language we use to discuss mental health and juvenile justice—and even more careful about how we meet the mental health needs of justice-involved youth.

Think of the Kids: Four Questions with Two Child Psychology Authors

To mark Children’s Mental Health Awareness Day (May 4), we posed a series of questions to the authors of two titles from APA’s Magination Press, which publishes innovative books that help children deal with the many challenges and problems they face as they grow up.

7 Essential Tips to Help You Master Disciplining Your Kids

Discipline has a significant role to play in what is arguably the world’s most important job—raising children to be moral and responsible members of society. And, not surprisingly, there’s no shortage of advice about how to do it. Unfortunately, a lot of it is contradictory.

Why Positive Parenting Trumps Physical Punishment When It Comes to Disciplining Kids

Even in the best of circumstances, parenting is super hard work and takes tremendous patience. When we have so many other concerns in life and then we add in a child who is misbehaving, it is tempting to give the child a smack. But let me tell you what the research shows: Spanking does not achieve our parenting goals.

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