Applying Psychological Science, Benefiting Society

Tag: depression

We Lose Too Many Vietnam Veterans to Suicide: Here’s How You Can Help

As our Vietnam veteran population ages, many may become increasingly vulnerable for death by suicide. Despite the fact that the Vietnam war occurred approximately 40 years ago, the moral injuries sustained are still felt by many who served our country.

How Mindfulness Can Lower Your Stress and Anxiety in 2017

It’s a new year and we know that 2016 was a stressful year for many of us. Thinking of a way to manage your stress and anxiety in the year ahead? Practicing mindfulness may be the answer.

Suffering from Depression is Pointless

October 6th is National Depression Screening Day. This day affords the opportunity to receive a free, anonymous and confidential screen for a mood disorder. Depression’s end game is the death of its victim. But, screenings help all those who may be afflicted to begin the process of understanding and healing. Please do yourself a favor if you are struggling with your mood, and take the brave and wise step to get screened.

How to Help People with Mental Health Conditions Quit Smoking for Good

Rebecca, a former smoker featured in CDC’s Tips From Former Smokers campaign, started smoking cigarettes at age 16. Everyone in her family smoked, and once she started smoking, she quickly became addicted. She kept smoking into adulthood. While she tried to stop, she had difficulty quitting. “I probably tried to quit smoking at least half a dozen times, but the addiction was so strong.”

Postpartum Depression and Race: What We All Should Know

Up to 1 in 7 women experience postpartum depression, a very real and serious mood disorder. Studies show that new mothers of color have rates of postpartum depression soaring close to 38% compared with the 13 – 19% rate for all new mothers.

Depression Screening Works and Now It Can Work for Pregnant and Postpartum Women

By Amalia Corby-Edwards, MS (Senior Legislative and Federal Affairs Officer, APA Public Interest Directorate) You may not have heard much about this, but something just happened that could positively impact millions of women and their families. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) just included pregnant and postpartum women in the new depression screening guidelines. … Read More ›

In Case You Missed It

In Case You Missed It – May 15, 2015 – Black girls matter, abuse of mentally ill prisoners, 40 years of bullying research

In this week’s In Case You Missed It (a roundup of articles related to psychology, health, mental health and social justice collated from multiple news and commentary websites) we cover the impact of race and poverty on black girls, the routine physical abuse experienced by mentally ill inmates, the link between chronic depression and risk of stroke… Read More ›

In Case You Missed It

In Case You Missed It – March 6, 2015

Welcome to our new feature – In Case You Missed It, a weekly roundup of recent news articles related to issues of psychology, health and mental health, social justice and the public interest that you may be interested in. This week, we have stories ranging from a new campaign to raise awareness of the importance of… Read More ›

Sad African American boy

John’s Story: How Racism and Classism Operate Within the Mental Health Care System

This post continues our new blog series on poverty. As our nation reflects on its progress in fighting poverty over the last 50 years, this blog series will highlight how psychology can contribute further to this discussion. By Eric Greene, PhD (Clinical Psychologist) I would like to address the inherent racism, classism and oppressive dynamics which fill… Read More ›

Portrait of elderly man lost in thought

When Will We Face the Facts about Suicide in Older Men?

By Amy Fiske, PhD (Associate Professor of Clinical Psychology, West Virginia University) Missing the Group Most at Risk This is National Suicide Prevention Week. Much will be said and written this week about suicide and how to prevent it. Most of it will not even mention the group at greatest risk of suicide: older men…. Read More ›

Contact

American Psychological Association
Public Interest Directorate
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Washington, DC 20002-4242
Phone: (202) 336-6056
Email: publicinterest@apa.org