[CROSS-POST] Action or Inaction in the Wake of the Parkland Florida Tragedy? Preventing Gun Violence Through Model Legislation

This blog post is cross-posted from Community Psychology, the Society for Community Research and Action’s blog. SCRA is Division 27 of the American Psychological Association. By Christopher Corbett, MA (APA Division 27 Member) Introduction As the nation reels from another mass shooting that has killed at least 17 people and injured at least 15 more […]

The Second Anniversary of the Pulse Shooting Reminds Us Why Gun Control Matters to the LGBTQ Community

Today, we remember the 49 people lost two years ago on this day in a senseless act of gun violence during the Pulse Nightclub shooting. Most of those lost that night were young, Latinx members of the LGBTQ community simply enjoying a night out with their friends and loved ones, and yet, somehow there are still conversations going on across America questioning whether gun control should be an LGBTQ priority.

Don’t Blame Mental Illness for Our Nation’s Gun Violence Epidemic

After every mass shooting, politicians mindlessly follow the lead of the NRA and call for mental health reform as a panacea for gun violence. This approach to reducing gun deaths is based on the assertion that people with serious mental illness (SMI) pose a special risk of gun violence. This inaccurate myth has serious harmful consequences, as it contributes mightily to the stigma already endured by people with SMI in America.

Woman consoling teenage girl

What is One Simple Thing You Can Do to Prevent Gun Violence at School? Say Something

Say Something Week empowers children to help others and prevent tragedies. They are taught to ‘Say Something’ to a trusted adult to prevent a friend from harming themselves or others. This programing has the potential to save lives in the communities it reaches. Though it is a daunting task to ensure that no student ever has to go to school in fear, campaigns such as Say Something Week can work with schools and youth programs to maximize their safety, learning, and potential.

Are You Talking to Parents About Keeping Guns Away from Children? 5 Reasons You Absolutely Should

Did you know that 1 in 3 homes with kids has a gun, many unlocked and loaded? June 21 is ASK (Asking Saves Kids) Day – a national observance that reminds health professionals, parents, and caregivers about the importance of asking if there are unlocked guns in the homes where children live and play. Although the conversation may be awkward, having it could potentially save a child’s life. Here are five reasons why psychologists should talk to their patients about gun safety.

[RE-POST] #WearOrange: The One Simple Thing You Can Do to Address Gun Violence

The financial cost of gun violence in the United States was an estimated $229 billion in 2012; this amount does not account for the psychological toll on those directly or indirectly affected by firearm violence–those who witness or fear firearm violence in their homes or communities or who are left behind when a loved one dies by suicide.

100+ Resources for the Aftermath of the Orlando Mass Shooting Tragedy

On June 12, 2016 rapid gunfire tore through Orlando’s Pulse gay nightclub in an act of violence that jarred the nation—and garnered global attention. How could this happen? What can I do? How can I cope? Where do we go from here? No one perspective and no single resource can address each of these inquiries. Fortunately, in the time since the attack, a number of online resources, articles, and videos—some old, and many new—have circulated in relation to the event and its aftermath.

Firearm Violence Prevention is a Human Rights Issue

By Susan H. McDaniel, PhD (APA President) and Cynthia D. Belar, PhD (APA Interim CEO) June 28 is the anniversary of the Stonewall riots, which launched lesbian and gay rights as a mass movement and is commemorated in the LGBT Pride celebrations. We take this occasion to reaffirm the American Psychological Association’s commitment to removing […]

7 Ways to Talk to Children and Youth about the Shootings in Orlando

Once again our nation is coping with a violent tragedy. In the aftermath of the Orlando terrorist attack, we find ourselves distressed, grief-stricken, and even angry that such a horrible thing could happen. Children and teens may find the event even more challenging. Here are some suggestions on talking with your children about what happened.

“Don’t Believe the Hype”: 4 Reasons to Doubt That Most Mass Shooters are Mentally Ill

  By Joel Dvoskin, PhD, ABPP (Chair, Nevada Behavioral Health and Wellness Council) Too often, even the most well-intentioned among us believe that most mass shootings are carried out by those with untreated mental illness. As a forensic and clinical psychologist with extensive experience treating individuals with serious mental illness, and as a member of […]