Psychology Benefits Society

Applying Psychological Science, Benefiting Society

Tag Archive for ‘media’

9 Ways to Talk to Your Kids about the 15th Anniversary of September 11

Children and teens have grown up in a world changed forever by the September 11 attacks. They have little or no memory of the United States not involved in the wars which followed the attacks. Media coverage of large-scale tragedies, including coverage of anniversaries of such events, can lead to emotional stress for some children and teens. The intensive 15th anniversary coverage of the terrorist attacks of September 11 may produce such distress.

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In Case You Missed It – May 22, 2015 – Racial double standard in Waco coverage, suicide increases in Black children

In Case You Missed It

In this week’s In Case You Missed It (a roundup of articles related to psychology, health, mental health and social justice collated from multiple news and commentary websites) we cover the racial double standard in media coverage of the Waco shooting compared with Baltimore, launching of a new Police Data Initiative, the sharp increase in suicide rates among Black children and more. Make sure to also check out these APA publications: Monitor on Psychology […]

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In Case You Missed It – April 17, 2015

In Case You Missed It

Welcome to In Case You Missed It, a weekly roundup of news articles related to issues of psychology, health and mental health, social justice and the public interest that you may be interested in. We collate these articles from multiple news and commentary websites. This week we look at stories covering the misrepresentation of mental illness in mass media, nationwide marches to raise the federal minimum wage, the one year anniversary […]

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Racial Perceptions of Crime and Support for Punitive Policies

Hands of different colors behind bars

This is part of our ongoing series of blog posts about race, racism and law enforcement in communities of color. By Nazgol Ghandnoosh, PhD (Research Analyst, The Sentencing Project) “When you think about people who break into homes and businesses, approximately what percent would you say are black?” White Americans who responded to this survey question in 2010 overestimated the actual share of burglaries committed by African Americans by 27%. They similarly overestimated […]

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Active, Engaged, Meaningful and Interactive: Putting the “Education” Back in Educational Apps

Young girl using tablet

By Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, PhD and Roberta Michnick Golinkoff, PhD  Are you overwhelmed by the host of stimulating digital toys and games intricately designed to build better brains for the new world order?   As the recent Joan Ganz Coony report noted, there are so many “educational” e-products that it is hard to know which are truly educational and which are just borrowing the “educational” adjective as an add-on label for their […]

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Too Sexy Too Soon: A Mother’s Battle Against the Sexualization of Girls

Young girl applying lipstick

By Tina Wolridge (PI Communications Staff) One of the hardest responsibilities of being a parent to a 13 year old girl is explaining the sexualized images of young women that are seen on TV, in skimpy clothing, magazines and sexy videos (the list goes on). It seems like all I do is say, “You can’t watch or wear this.” I want my daughter to be valued for her mind, for […]

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