Applying Psychological Science, Benefiting Society

Tag: policing

Police tape saying "police line do not cross"

Why Evidence-Based Community Policing Needs to be the Norm, Not an Exception

Longstanding tensions between police and communities of color have reached a boiling point in the United States. If we are to heal as nation, we must first acknowledge and move beyond entrenched societal stereotypes that reduce people of color, particularly black men, to suspected criminals who should be feared.

Racial Trauma is Real: The Impact of Police Shootings on African Americans

There have been many changes within the criminal justice system as a means to deter crime and to keep citizens safe. However, research demonstrates that often times men of color are treated harshly which leads to negative perceptions of police officers. The recent shootings in Baton Rouge, Falcon Heights, and Dallas have exposed many individuals and their families to incidents of police brutality that reminds us that as a society work needs to be done to improve police and community relations.

Diverse kids holding hands

How to Talk to Our Kids about the Tragic Shootings in Louisiana, Minnesota and Dallas

Families around the country are coming together to talk about the officer-involved shootings in Louisiana, Minnesota, and the ambush of police officers in Dallas, Texas. These events come shortly after the violence in Orlando. In fact, it seems that acts of violence are in the news on a regular basis. How do we begin to explain all of this to our children when we, as adults, are having our own difficulties with what is occurring?

In Case You Missed It header

The Difficulty of Transitioning to College for Students with Mental Health Issues, PTSD in WWII Veterans, Resilience of Refugees – In Case You Missed It – September 18, 2015

Welcome back to In Case You Missed It (our weekly roundup of articles touching on psychology, health, mental health and social justice issues from multiple news and commentary websites). This week, we address the challenges affecting first year college students with mental health issues, PTSD affecting World War II veterans 70 years post conflict, the resilience of refugees streaming… Read More ›

Addressing Biased Policing Through Science-Based Training

This is part of our ongoing series of blog posts about race, racism and law enforcement in communities of color. By Lorie Fridell, PhD (Associate Professor of Criminology, University of South Florida) Do you claim to be color-blind?  Do you believe that you do not notice when a person is Caucasian, Black, Hispanic, or Asian?  Well then, you… Read More ›

“Death by Legal Intervention” by the Numbers

This is part of our ongoing series of blog posts about race, racism and law enforcement in communities of color. By Suzanne Lea, PhD (Fellow, Interactivity Foundation, and Adjunct Professor, University of Maryland, Baltimore County) News of a citizen being killed or assaulted by police, or a citizen who dies in police custody, seems to be nearly a… Read More ›

In Case You Missed It

Supreme Court Rules on Housing, Marriage Equality, and Health Care, New Police Shooting Data – In Case You Missed It – July 1, 2015

It was an incredibly busy news week! In this week’s In Case You Missed It (our roundup of articles touching on psychology, health, mental health and social justice issues from multiple news and commentary websites), we cover the  landmark Supreme Court decisions on housing discrimination, marriage equality, and the Affordable Care Act, new data on fatal police shootings… Read More ›

In Case You Missed It

In Case You Missed It – May 22, 2015 – Racial double standard in Waco coverage, suicide increases in Black children

In this week’s In Case You Missed It (a roundup of articles related to psychology, health, mental health and social justice collated from multiple news and commentary websites) we cover the racial double standard in media coverage of the Waco shooting compared with Baltimore, launching of a new Police Data Initiative, the sharp increase in suicide rates among… Read More ›

Young people gather around the Michael Brown memorial in Ferguson, MO

Close to Home: A Psychologist Reflects on Providing Crisis Counseling in Ferguson

This is part of our ongoing series of blog posts about race, racism and law enforcement in communities of color. By Jameca Falconer, PhD (Counseling Psychologist, Logan University) After watching the horrors in Ferguson, Missouri, unfold only a few miles away from where I live, I began looking closely at social justice strategies as a way to heal… Read More ›

Riot police

Teachable Moments About Policing from Ferguson, Missouri

This is part of our ongoing series of blog posts about race, racism and law enforcement in communities of color. By Tom Tyler, PhD (Professor of Law and Psychology, Yale Law School) Ferguson represents another step in the escalating failure of the “broken windows” view of crime that has gained ascendancy during the past generation.  Under this approach, the… Read More ›

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