25 Ways Psychologists Can Work to End Poverty

Today marks the 25th anniversary of the declaration of the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty. In 2018, poverty is defined as living on an annual income of less than $12,140 for an individual and $25,100 for a family of four in the contiguous United States (US Department of Health and Human Services, 2018). While these numbers reflect Americans living in poverty as a whole, they do not adequately capture the millions living in deep poverty. Psychologists are vital to the effort of eradicating poverty – here are 25 ways they can help.

The Cost of Being Poor in a Warming World

f you don’t feel the impacts of climate change directly in your daily life, you probably aren’t poor.

Major news outlets regularly publish features on scientific studies by climatologists ringing the alarm on how many degrees global temperatures have increased, the rise in severity and frequency of natural disasters, and the dire future effects on the environment if human behavior does not change. However, most people aren’t climatologists or journalists. Climate change, for some folks, is an abstraction discussed over the dinner table or argued about in social media comment sections, or perhaps a notion thought about when presented with the choice of garbage or recycling bins.

After Fifty Years, Why the Poor People’s Campaign is More Relevant Than Ever

The Poor People’s Campaign (May 12, 1968 – June 24, 1968) was a national multiethnic movement that sought to gain economic justice for poor people in the United States. The campaign was in response to the shortcomings of the War on Poverty. Its impact drew attention to the crisis of poverty in America. Fifty years later, the Poor People’s Campaign is still a much-needed force for shedding light on the lives of 43 million Americans living in poverty. Psychological science has extensively documented the mental and physical health impacts of poverty over the lifespan.

5 Ways to Teach Your Students about World Poverty

I teach about issues of economic justice in many of my classes, but this is the first year that I will formally observe what is also known as World Poverty Day. As I was brainstorming different ways to teach about poverty across the globe, I realized it would be beneficial to enlist the assistance of two undergraduate students. Together we developed this list of resources and activities.

Health and Healthcare Injustice: Why We Really Should Care About HIV Disparities

By Alyssa Arentoft, PhD (California State University, Northridge) & Monica Rivera Mindt, PhD (Fordham University & Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai) “Of all the forms of inequality, injustice in health care is the most shocking and inhumane.” – Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Perhaps nowhere are health and healthcare inequities so glaring as in HIV. […]

Penalizing the Poor and Homeless: Psychology’s Contribution

By Maha Khalid (Program Coordinator, Office on Socioeconomic Status) “Poverty is not an accident. Like slavery and apartheid, it is man-made and can be removed by the actions of human beings.” – Nelson Mandela Communities across the country respond to poverty and homelessness with a variety of programs: food banks, emergency shelters, transitional housing, and […]

In Case You Missed It

Poverty’s Impact on Short-Term Decision-Making, Street Harassment, Mass Incarceration and the Black Family – In Case You Missed It – September 29, 2015

Welcome back to In Case You Missed It (our weekly roundup of articles touching on psychology, health, mental health and social justice issues from multiple news and commentary websites). This week, we address the impact of poverty on short-term decision-making, why we need to take street harassment seriously, the devastating impact of mass incarceration on the Black family and more.  […]

In Case You Missed It

What Makes People Gay (An Update), Ending Solitary Confinement in California Prisons – In Case You Missed It – September 1, 2015

Welcome back to In Case You Missed It (our weekly roundup of articles touching on psychology, health, mental health and social justice issues from multiple news and commentary websites). This week, we address the advances over a decade of sexual orientation research, the impact of post-Katrina recovery policies on Black women in public housing, an end to solitary […]

National Adjunct Walkout Day protester

Adjunct Faculty: Highly Educated, Working Hard for Society, and Struggling To Survive

By Gretchen M. Reevy, PhD (Lecturer, Psychology Department, California State University, East Bay) When we think of people who live below the poverty line in the U.S., we often picture individuals who lack adequate medical care, who are homeless, who are unable to provide nutritious food for themselves and their families, and if young, people who […]