After Fifty Years, Why the Poor People’s Campaign is More Relevant Than Ever

The Poor People’s Campaign (May 12, 1968 – June 24, 1968) was a national multiethnic movement that sought to gain economic justice for poor people in the United States. The campaign was in response to the shortcomings of the War on Poverty. Its impact drew attention to the crisis of poverty in America. Fifty years later, the Poor People’s Campaign is still a much-needed force for shedding light on the lives of 43 million Americans living in poverty. Psychological science has extensively documented the mental and physical health impacts of poverty over the lifespan.

5 Ways to Teach Your Students about World Poverty

I teach about issues of economic justice in many of my classes, but this is the first year that I will formally observe what is also known as World Poverty Day. As I was brainstorming different ways to teach about poverty across the globe, I realized it would be beneficial to enlist the assistance of two undergraduate students. Together we developed this list of resources and activities.

Police tape saying "police line do not cross"

The Need for Meaningful Policy Change: The More Things Change, the More They Stay the Same

Last year, APA celebrated its Congressional Fellowship Program’s 40 years of success on Capitol Hill. The article below by a former APA Congressional Fellow highlights the contribution of psychologists to public policy and of the Fellowship experience to Fellows’ professional development. Heather E. Bullock, PhD (Professor of Psychology, University of California – Santa Cruz) As we approach […]

It’s Not Just Us: We Can’t Fight Poverty Without Collaboration

This post continues our new blog series on poverty. As our nation reflects on its progress in fighting poverty over the last 50 years, this blog series will highlight how psychology can contribute further to this discussion. By Samantha Melvin (Manager, NEED Lab at Columbia University) Great research starts with a spark: a lunge for pen and […]