Applying Psychological Science, Benefiting Society

Tag: public policy

“All Politics is Local”: 5 Simple Tips for Becoming a Better Advocate

Interest in our political process has dramatically increased across the U.S. since the last election. People want accountability from their elected representatives and are ready to engage on complex issues such as health care coverage, immigration, and tax reform. The demand for grassroots advocacy training has grown along with this increased engagement. Here are some tips to help you get started.

For Richer or Poorer: What Works to Reduce Poverty in America?

How can we improve the economic wellbeing of American families? This was one of the issues that dominated the 2016 election cycle, with each candidate proposing a different way forward. Across party lines, we can all agree that poverty is harmful for our society.

Historical Trauma in the Present: Why APA Cannot Remain Silent on the Dakota Access Pipeline

Protesters being marked with numbers, put in dog kennels and shot with rubber bullets. These do not sound like events that should occur in modern day America. Unfortunately, according to media reports, these are some of the first-hand accounts of what is happening in North Dakota as protests escalate over the Dakota Access Pipeline.

Health and Healthcare Injustice: Why We Really Should Care About HIV Disparities

By Alyssa Arentoft, PhD (California State University, Northridge) & Monica Rivera Mindt, PhD (Fordham University & Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai) “Of all the forms of inequality, injustice in health care is the most shocking and inhumane.” – Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Perhaps nowhere are health and healthcare inequities so glaring as in HIV…. Read More ›

Food Stamp Cuts May Put 1 Million More Americans At Risk of Hunger: What We Can Do About It

By Sara Buckingham, MA (Public Interest Policy Scholar, APA Public Interest Government Relations Office)   How do you decide between heating your apartment, purchasing lifesaving medication, and eating? As of April 1, up to 1 million more Americans will face that decision.   Who is affected by hunger? Nearly 50 million Americans – including one… Read More ›

No Progress, No Change: HIV Funding Stagnant for Third Year in a Row

By Sarah J. Javier, MS (PhD Candidate in Health Psychology at Virginia Commonwealth University) On February 9, President Obama released his proposed budget for FY 2017. The $4 trillion budget included several provisions for research on clean energy, education, and Medicaid. However, for advocates of HIV/AIDS research, one thing was startlingly clear: HIV/AIDS is fast… Read More ›

Professional black woman under cherry blossoms

Why Does HIV Impact African American Women Harder Than Everyone Else and What Can You Do to Help?

By Leo Rennie, MPA (Senior Legislative & Federal Affairs Officer, APA Public Interest)   February 7th marked the annual observance of National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day. The day is an opportunity to raise awareness about HIV and AIDS and to promote HIV testing in the Black community.  Sadly, 35 years into the HIV epidemic the… Read More ›

Depression Screening Works and Now It Can Work for Pregnant and Postpartum Women

By Amalia Corby-Edwards, MS (Senior Legislative and Federal Affairs Officer, APA Public Interest Directorate) You may not have heard much about this, but something just happened that could positively impact millions of women and their families. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) just included pregnant and postpartum women in the new depression screening guidelines. … Read More ›

Penalizing the Poor and Homeless: Psychology’s Contribution

By Maha Khalid (Program Coordinator, Office on Socioeconomic Status) “Poverty is not an accident. Like slavery and apartheid, it is man-made and can be removed by the actions of human beings.” – Nelson Mandela Communities across the country respond to poverty and homelessness with a variety of programs: food banks, emergency shelters, transitional housing, and… Read More ›

Are the Mentally Ill Being Unfairly Targeted by the FBI’s Gun List? The Mysterious Link Between Autism and Extraordinary Abilities, “Midlife Crisis Is Just a Myth.” In Case You Missed It– January 20th, 2016

Welcome back to In Case You Missed It (our weekly roundup of articles touching on psychology, health, mental health and social justice issues from multiple news and commentary websites). This week, we address whether the mentally ill are being unfairly targeted by the FBI’s gun list, the mysterious link between autism and extraordinary abilities, and whether the midlife crisis is… Read More ›

Contact

American Psychological Association
Public Interest Directorate
750 First Street, NE
Washington, DC 20002-4242
Phone: (202) 336-6056
Email: publicinterest@apa.org