Six Essential Lessons You Learn from Working on Capitol Hill as an APA Congressional Fellow

  By Meghann Galloway, PhD & Laura Knudtson, PhD (2017-2018 APA Congressional Fellows)   Pinch me… is this a dream? Am I really here? Did I actually just ride the elevator with Bernie Sanders? Was Lisa Murkowski ahead of me in line for coffee?   The novelty of working as an APA Congressional Fellow in […]

What Can We Do to Combat the Maternal Mortality Crisis Affecting Black Women in America?

Alarmingly, maternal mortality rates for women living in the U.S. are the highest in the developed world with stark racial disparities. Black women specifically have the highest maternal mortality rate in the U.S. and are nearly four times more likely to die from pregnancy-related causes compared to White women.

[CROSS-POST] Action or Inaction in the Wake of the Parkland Florida Tragedy? Preventing Gun Violence Through Model Legislation

This blog post is cross-posted from Community Psychology, the Society for Community Research and Action’s blog. SCRA is Division 27 of the American Psychological Association. By Christopher Corbett, MA (APA Division 27 Member) Introduction As the nation reels from another mass shooting that has killed at least 17 people and injured at least 15 more […]

The Second Anniversary of the Pulse Shooting Reminds Us Why Gun Control Matters to the LGBTQ Community

Today, we remember the 49 people lost two years ago on this day in a senseless act of gun violence during the Pulse Nightclub shooting. Most of those lost that night were young, Latinx members of the LGBTQ community simply enjoying a night out with their friends and loved ones, and yet, somehow there are still conversations going on across America questioning whether gun control should be an LGBTQ priority.

After Fifty Years, Why the Poor People’s Campaign is More Relevant Than Ever

The Poor People’s Campaign (May 12, 1968 – June 24, 1968) was a national multiethnic movement that sought to gain economic justice for poor people in the United States. The campaign was in response to the shortcomings of the War on Poverty. Its impact drew attention to the crisis of poverty in America. Fifty years later, the Poor People’s Campaign is still a much-needed force for shedding light on the lives of 43 million Americans living in poverty. Psychological science has extensively documented the mental and physical health impacts of poverty over the lifespan.

“All Politics is Local”: 5 Simple Tips for Becoming a Better Advocate

Interest in our political process has dramatically increased across the U.S. since the last election. People want accountability from their elected representatives and are ready to engage on complex issues such as health care coverage, immigration, and tax reform. The demand for grassroots advocacy training has grown along with this increased engagement. Here are some tips to help you get started.

Historical Trauma in the Present: Why APA Cannot Remain Silent on the Dakota Access Pipeline

Protesters being marked with numbers, put in dog kennels and shot with rubber bullets. These do not sound like events that should occur in modern day America. Unfortunately, according to media reports, these are some of the first-hand accounts of what is happening in North Dakota as protests escalate over the Dakota Access Pipeline.

Health and Healthcare Injustice: Why We Really Should Care About HIV Disparities

By Alyssa Arentoft, PhD (California State University, Northridge) & Monica Rivera Mindt, PhD (Fordham University & Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai) “Of all the forms of inequality, injustice in health care is the most shocking and inhumane.” – Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Perhaps nowhere are health and healthcare inequities so glaring as in HIV. […]