Applying Psychological Science, Benefiting Society

Tag: trauma

Historical Trauma in the Present: Why APA Cannot Remain Silent on the Dakota Access Pipeline

Protesters being marked with numbers, put in dog kennels and shot with rubber bullets. These do not sound like events that should occur in modern day America. Unfortunately, according to media reports, these are some of the first-hand accounts of what is happening in North Dakota as protests escalate over the Dakota Access Pipeline.

9 Ways to Talk to Your Kids about the 15th Anniversary of September 11

Children and teens have grown up in a world changed forever by the September 11 attacks. They have little or no memory of the United States not involved in the wars which followed the attacks. Media coverage of large-scale tragedies, including coverage of anniversaries of such events, can lead to emotional stress for some children and teens. The intensive 15th anniversary coverage of the terrorist attacks of September 11 may produce such distress.

We Need to Talk About How Race-Related Trauma Hurts Black and Brown Youth in Schools

Witnessing or experiencing race-related trauma damages the psychological wellbeing of minority youth. African American, American Indian, and Latino youth not only encounter race-related trauma in their neighborhoods but also in school. Schools should be a safe space for all children, but some disturbing data prove otherwise.

Racial Trauma is Real: The Impact of Police Shootings on African Americans

There have been many changes within the criminal justice system as a means to deter crime and to keep citizens safe. However, research demonstrates that often times men of color are treated harshly which leads to negative perceptions of police officers. The recent shootings in Baton Rouge, Falcon Heights, and Dallas have exposed many individuals and their families to incidents of police brutality that reminds us that as a society work needs to be done to improve police and community relations.

Diverse kids holding hands

How to Talk to Our Kids about the Tragic Shootings in Louisiana, Minnesota and Dallas

Families around the country are coming together to talk about the officer-involved shootings in Louisiana, Minnesota, and the ambush of police officers in Dallas, Texas. These events come shortly after the violence in Orlando. In fact, it seems that acts of violence are in the news on a regular basis. How do we begin to explain all of this to our children when we, as adults, are having our own difficulties with what is occurring?

Responding to the Tragedy in Orlando: Helpful Responses for LGBTQ People and Allies

What took place in Orlando on the morning of June 12, 2016 was a hate crime and an act of terror. This event, despite its horror, will not stop the movement for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer rights. Here is what we know can help based on over two decades of research.

7 Ways to Talk to Children and Youth about the Shootings in Orlando

Once again our nation is coping with a violent tragedy. In the aftermath of the Orlando terrorist attack, we find ourselves distressed, grief-stricken, and even angry that such a horrible thing could happen. Children and teens may find the event even more challenging. Here are some suggestions on talking with your children about what happened.

In Case You Missed It

In Case You Missed It – May 22, 2015 – Racial double standard in Waco coverage, suicide increases in Black children

In this week’s In Case You Missed It (a roundup of articles related to psychology, health, mental health and social justice collated from multiple news and commentary websites) we cover the racial double standard in media coverage of the Waco shooting compared with Baltimore, launching of a new Police Data Initiative, the sharp increase in suicide rates among… Read More ›

Japanese family in the park

ACT in Japan: Bridging Cultures to Help Families Raise Children without Violence

April is National Child Abuse Prevention Month. This is the third in a series of posts about APA’s ACT Raising Safe Kids (ACT-RSK) program. ACT-RSK teaches positive parenting skills to parents and caregivers of children from birth to age 8. Read our first and second posts in the series here and here. By Reiko True, PhD & Nahoko Nishizawa, PsyD (ACT Raising… Read More ›

Sad African American boy

John’s Story: How Racism and Classism Operate Within the Mental Health Care System

This post continues our new blog series on poverty. As our nation reflects on its progress in fighting poverty over the last 50 years, this blog series will highlight how psychology can contribute further to this discussion. By Eric Greene, PhD (Clinical Psychologist) I would like to address the inherent racism, classism and oppressive dynamics which fill… Read More ›

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