Psychology Benefits Society

Applying Psychological Science, Benefiting Society

Tag Archive for ‘work’

The Choice No Parent Should Have to Make: The Case for Paid Family Leave

By Sara Buckingham (PhD candidate in Clinical Psychology and Community & Applied Social Psychology at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County) Like other American families, while Melissa and Rob eagerly anticipated the birth of their second child, they also had to decide how much time they could afford to take off work to care for their newborn. Physicians and psychologists recommend leave time of at least 6–8 weeks because: Leave benefits […]

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Does Fatigue Among U.S. Workers Contribute to a Lackluster Post-“Great Recession” Come-back?

By Bengt B. Arnetz, MD, PhD, MScEpi, MPH (Professor of Family and Preventive Medicine and Chair, Department of Family Medicine, College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University) The recovery after the “Great Recession” in terms of high-quality jobs and economic growth has been slow. This is usually attributed to economic reasons. However, I believe a major reason for the current challenges to a healthy economy is the nonsustainable working conditions facing […]

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How to Get Your Children to Eat Better, Brain’s Signaling Systems Might Determine PTSD Severity, How Terrorism Affects Voter Psychology and more- In Case You Missed It– December 14th, 2015

Welcome back to In Case You Missed It (our weekly roundup of articles touching on psychology, health, mental health and social justice issues from multiple news and commentary websites). This week, we address how to get your children to eat better, how the brain’s signaling systems might determine PTSD severity, how terrorism affects voter psychology, and more.  How to Get Your Children to Eat Better – The Wall Street Journal 18% of American children from […]

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Conferences as Community Builders

This is a cross-post from Minding the Workplace (the New Workplace Institute blog). Professor David Yamada reflects on his experiences at the recent Work, Stress and Health conference in Atlanta, GA. By David Yamada, JD (Professor of Law, Suffolk University Boston and Director, New Workplace Institute) All too often, academic and professional conferences are something of a chore, or in the worst cases, events to be endured. By contrast, a conference that […]

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