Applying Psychological Science, Benefiting Society

Criminal and Juvenile Justice rss

Homeless man sleeping on the sidewalk

How to End the Criminalization of Poverty

This post continues our new blog series on poverty. As our nation reflects on its progress in fighting poverty over the last 50 years, this blog series will highlight how psychology can contribute further to this discussion. By Dionne Jones, PhD (Member, APA Committee on Socioeconomic Status) A New York Times article once stated, “It’s too bad… Read More ›

Young people gather around the Michael Brown memorial in Ferguson, MO

Close to Home: A Psychologist Reflects on Providing Crisis Counseling in Ferguson

This is part of our ongoing series of blog posts about race, racism and law enforcement in communities of color. By Jameca Falconer, PhD (Counseling Psychologist, Logan University) After watching the horrors in Ferguson, Missouri, unfold only a few miles away from where I live, I began looking closely at social justice strategies as a way to heal… Read More ›

Hands of different colors behind bars

Racial Perceptions of Crime and Support for Punitive Policies

This is part of our ongoing series of blog posts about race, racism and law enforcement in communities of color. By Nazgol Ghandnoosh, PhD (Research Analyst, The Sentencing Project) “When you think about people who break into homes and businesses, approximately what percent would you say are black?” White Americans who responded to this survey question in 2010… Read More ›

Police tape saying "police line do not cross"

Ferguson and the Need for Effective Community Policing

This is part of our ongoing series of blog posts about race, racism and law enforcement in communities of color. By Ellen Scrivner, PhD, ABPP We thought the days of racially divisive policing in the 60s were long gone. Then, Ferguson erupted and captured the nation’s attention. Although we have seen progress in race relations over the years,… Read More ›

Riot police

Teachable Moments About Policing from Ferguson, Missouri

This is part of our ongoing series of blog posts about race, racism and law enforcement in communities of color. By Tom Tyler, PhD (Professor of Law and Psychology, Yale Law School) Ferguson represents another step in the escalating failure of the “broken windows” view of crime that has gained ascendancy during the past generation.  Under this approach, the… Read More ›

Handcuffs on top of the American flag

Race, Racism and Law Enforcement in Communities of Color: A Call to Action

By Gwendolyn P. Keita, PhD (Executive Director, APA Public Interest Directorate)  The shooting death of Michael Brown, an unarmed African American teenager, at the hands of a police officer has led to outrage and continuing civil unrest in Ferguson, MO. These events are emblematic of the fraught and often problematic interactions that communities of color have… Read More ›

Want Justice? Stop Tolerating These Realities

Originally posted on 2014 APA Annual Convention:
One in three black male children born in the United States is expected to go to jail or prison at some point in his lifetime, said public interest lawyer and Equal Justice Initiative Executive Director Bryan Stevenson, JD, at an APA convention session on Saturday. “That wasn’t true in…

Teenage boy in handcuffs

5 Reasons to Act Now on Juvenile Justice Reform

By Kerry Bolger, PhD (Public Interest Government Relations Office) Did you know that the U.S. incarcerates more of its kids per capita than any other developed nation—and that we spend about $5 billion a year of taxpayers’ money to keep them locked up? Is that because a lot more kids in America are committing violent… Read More ›

Child's hands holding prison bars

5 Essential Reasons to Keep Kids Out of Adult Jails

By Kerry Bolger, PhD (Public Interest Government Relations Office) Federal law protects children in the juvenile justice system from being held in adult jails.  But did you know that, on a typical day in America, over 7,500 children are locked up in adult jails? That’s because federal protections to keep kids out of adult jails and… Read More ›

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