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Disability Issues rss

What Can We Do to Prevent the Abuse of Children with Disabilities?

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October 7, 2016

In February 2016, Ethan Okula, a 10 year-old child in foster care for three years, died from a bowel obstruction after numerous adults neglected to drive him to the hospital emergency room or call 911. In many ways, this tragedy is no surprise; Ethan embodied many known risk factors for child neglect and abuse as described by columnist Mike Newall of the Philadelphia Inquirer on July 18, 2016.

Parental Rights Include Disability Equality: A Call to Action for Psychology

By Alette Coble-Temple, PsyD (Ms. Wheelchair California 2015 and Professor, John F. Kennedy University) Becoming a parent is considered a basic human right in our country. However, people with disabilities are often denied this right. It’s 2015, yet people with disabilities continue to encounter legal, medical, and social resistance to becoming parents (Preston, 2012; Coleman,… Read More ›

How 25 Years of the “Americans with Disabilities Act” Has Benefited All of Us

By Dana S. Dunn, PhD (Professor of Psychology, Moravian College) Three cheers for the ADA at 25 years of age! The signing of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) into law in July 1990 dramatically changed the social and political landscape of the United States for the better. It greatly advanced civil rights for people… Read More ›

Challenging Words and Labels: How Should We Refer to Disability?

By Dana S. Dunn, PhD (Professor of Psychology and Assistant Dean for Special Projects, Moravian College) How should we talk about disability, especially perhaps, people with disabilities? Is saying “the disabled” or “disabled people” ok? Are there right and wrong ways to talk or write about disability? The American Psychological Association (APA) advocates that when referring… Read More ›

Heads Up, Health Professionals: 28 Tips for Treating Older Clients

By Megan Carlos, PhD (Member, APA Committee on Disability Issues in Psychology) and Jennifer Moye, PhD (Chair, APA Committee on Aging) On a Thursday at 3:30 pm, a psychologist received a request to evaluate the capacity of Mr. Mather, an 83 year old medical inpatient. He had previously agreed to a scheduled surgery, but was… Read More ›

Disabled couple making dinner with their daughter

People with Disabilities Aren’t Heroes – They’re People

By Dana S. Dunn, PhD (Professor of Psychology and Assistant Dean for Special Projects, Moravian College) One of my former students has muscular dystrophy. He uses a power wheelchair to get around. He tells me that it is not unusual for him to attract the interest of strangers when he is out and about with friends—in… Read More ›

How to Recognize and Respond to Violence Against Women with Disabilities

By Julie Williams, PsyD, CRC, ABPP (Member, APA Committee on Women in Psychology) If you’re a woman with a disability, you’re 40% more likely to be abused by your intimate partner than a woman without a disability according to research done in the past 10 years. Studies show that this abuse occurs at the hands… Read More ›

Hawaiian beach at sunset

5 Social Justice-Themed Sessions We Loved at APA Convention

By Efua Andoh (PI Communications Staff) The 2013 APA Convention in Honolulu, Hawaii wrapped up over the weekend. Our colleagues at the APA Convention blog were furiously documenting a wide swath of sessions and events on topics ranging from assisting the wrongfully incarcerated to why Americans are reluctant to discuss race. Here is a rundown of… Read More ›

Dr. Andrews at Briefing

5 Things Congress Can Do To Protect the Rights of Parents with Disabilities

By Erin Andrews, PsyD, ABPP (APA Committee on Disability Issues in Psychology) My interest in parenting and disability goes beyond the professional. I am a rehabilitation psychologist, but I am also a disabled parent myself. In an earlier post, I described the experiences that parents like myself go through. Today, I intend to outline the… Read More ›

Dr. Andrews and her son

What Mother’s Day Means to Me As a Parent with A Disability

By Erin Andrews, PsyD, ABPP (APA Committee on Disability Issues in Psychology) What does Mother’s Day mean to you? For me, it means enjoying the company of my beautiful son, Gavin, and loving and supportive fiancé, Todd. It also means having my rights as a mother protected. I am a rehabilitation psychologist and I care… Read More ›

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