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LGBT Issues rss

Is the Current Political Climate Hurting LGBTQ Youth? What Schools and Families Can Do

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May 17, 2017

How is the current sociopolitical climate impacting at-risk LGBTQ youth? It could predict more peer victimization of LGBTQ students. Parents and school personnel can do a lot to change community or school climate.

How Black Boys Turn Blue: The Effects of Masculine Ideology on Same-Gender Loving Men

They say, “Black boys turn blue in the moonlight”. In the Oscar winning movie Moonlight, the story follows character Chiron as he develops into a man. What’s interesting about Chiron’s story is that it mirrors that of countless other African American men. Chiron is simply not allowed to “be” – he’s bullied for being “Little,” beaten because of his demeanor, and denied the opportunity to safely and freely explore his sexuality. It is indeed under this distress that Black boys turn blue.

How the Federal Government Can Better Protect LGBTQ Students in Religious Universities & Colleges

This September, I met with staff members in the Office of Civil Rights, at the U.S. Department of Education (DOEd) in Washington, D.C. to talk about the risks posed to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer/questioning (LGBTQ) students by disaffirming religious universities/colleges (DRUs).

“I’m Not Just Black!”: Exploring Intersections of Identity

Through a very complete body of research, the field of psychology has established that a person’s identity is composed of several different parts. However, psychological research projects often only focus on one or two aspects of identity. As we move towards a more complete picture of human behavior, we must remember to keep in mind that the intersections of identity are a vital piece of that picture.

New CDC Survey Data Confirm the Severe Health Risks LGB Youth Face

On August 11, 2016, the CDC released the results of the first national study of sexual minority high school students. These data show that LGB students experience far greater risks of violence and bullying than their heterosexual peers.

Why Did the FDA Prevent Gay and Bisexual Men from Donating Blood in the Aftermath of Orlando?

After the horrific shooting on June 12, 2016 at Pulse, a popular gay bar in Orlando, Florida, many of the victims were in extreme need of blood transfusions. Driven by empathy and solidarity with the victims, gay and bisexual men rushed to area hospitals and blood donation centers to help, along with scores of their Orlando neighbors. Sadly, hundreds identifying as men who have sex with men (MSM) were turned away because current FDA regulations prohibit gay and bisexual men from donating blood unless they abstain from sex with other men for a full year before donating blood.

Why HIV Providers Should Care About the Orlando Shooting

Although the solid links between the LGBT community and the HIV prevention and treatment communities resulted in a strong show of solidarity after Orlando, there is another reason HIV care providers and educators should be concerned about the shooting and its aftermath: It is an instance of the stigma that can increase the risk of HIV transmission and reduce the ability of people with HIV to fight their disease.

100+ Resources for the Aftermath of the Orlando Mass Shooting Tragedy

On June 12, 2016 rapid gunfire tore through Orlando’s Pulse gay nightclub in an act of violence that jarred the nation—and garnered global attention. How could this happen? What can I do? How can I cope? Where do we go from here? No one perspective and no single resource can address each of these inquiries. Fortunately, in the time since the attack, a number of online resources, articles, and videos—some old, and many new—have circulated in relation to the event and its aftermath.

Firearm Violence Prevention is a Human Rights Issue

By Susan H. McDaniel, PhD (APA President) and Cynthia D. Belar, PhD (APA Interim CEO) June 28 is the anniversary of the Stonewall riots, which launched lesbian and gay rights as a mass movement and is commemorated in the LGBT Pride celebrations. We take this occasion to reaffirm the American Psychological Association’s commitment to removing… Read More ›

Responding to the Tragedy in Orlando: Helpful Responses for LGBTQ People and Allies

What took place in Orlando on the morning of June 12, 2016 was a hate crime and an act of terror. This event, despite its horror, will not stop the movement for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer rights. Here is what we know can help based on over two decades of research.

Contact

American Psychological Association
Public Interest Directorate
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Washington, DC 20002-4242
Phone: (202) 336-6056
Email: publicinterest@apa.org