Why Did the FDA Prevent Gay and Bisexual Men from Donating Blood in the Aftermath of Orlando?

After the horrific shooting on June 12, 2016 at Pulse, a popular gay bar in Orlando, Florida, many of the victims were in extreme need of blood transfusions. Driven by empathy and solidarity with the victims, gay and bisexual men rushed to area hospitals and blood donation centers to help, along with scores of their Orlando neighbors. Sadly, hundreds identifying as men who have sex with men (MSM) were turned away because current FDA regulations prohibit gay and bisexual men from donating blood unless they abstain from sex with other men for a full year before donating blood.

Why HIV Providers Should Care About the Orlando Shooting

Although the solid links between the LGBT community and the HIV prevention and treatment communities resulted in a strong show of solidarity after Orlando, there is another reason HIV care providers and educators should be concerned about the shooting and its aftermath: It is an instance of the stigma that can increase the risk of HIV transmission and reduce the ability of people with HIV to fight their disease.

100+ Resources for the Aftermath of the Orlando Mass Shooting Tragedy

On June 12, 2016 rapid gunfire tore through Orlando’s Pulse gay nightclub in an act of violence that jarred the nation—and garnered global attention. How could this happen? What can I do? How can I cope? Where do we go from here? No one perspective and no single resource can address each of these inquiries. Fortunately, in the time since the attack, a number of online resources, articles, and videos—some old, and many new—have circulated in relation to the event and its aftermath.

Firearm Violence Prevention is a Human Rights Issue

By Susan H. McDaniel, PhD (APA President) and Cynthia D. Belar, PhD (APA Interim CEO) June 28 is the anniversary of the Stonewall riots, which launched lesbian and gay rights as a mass movement and is commemorated in the LGBT Pride celebrations. We take this occasion to reaffirm the American Psychological Association’s commitment to removing […]

Responding to the Tragedy in Orlando: Helpful Responses for LGBTQ People and Allies

What took place in Orlando on the morning of June 12, 2016 was a hate crime and an act of terror. This event, despite its horror, will not stop the movement for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer rights. Here is what we know can help based on over two decades of research.

Are You a Boy or Girl? No: Living Outside the Gender Binary

Without knowledge about this vulnerable population and the best ways to support them, mental health providers may unintentionally mistreat gender non-binary people, who may perceive a lack of competence and resist treatment as a result. This article provides tips to mental health providers for working with gender non-binary clients.

What Do We Need to Know About the Health of Older LGBT Adults? NIH Greenlights New Research

By Mark Brennan-Ing, PhD (Director for Research and Evaluation at ACRIA, Center on HIV and Aging ) When we talk about fully including lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals in society, marriage equality and broader civil rights protections dominate our discourse. However, equally important are the numerous health disparities they experience in later life […]

Tipping Point or State of Emergency? Real Talk About Transgender Women of Color

By Sand C. Chang, PhD (Gender Specialist, Multi-Specialty Transitions Department, Kaiser Permanente) and Kimber Shelton, PhD (KLS Counseling & Consulting Services, Dallas, TX) In June 2014, TIME magazine featured Laverne Cox on the cover, the title reading “The Transgender Tipping Point.” The message to the world was, “We’ve arrived.” While the scales have tipped for […]

What Can We Do to Improve Bisexuals’ Mental Health?

By Tania Israel, PhD (Professor of Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology, University of California, Santa Barbara) I had never been in a room with so many known bisexuals. Approximately 100 bisexual advocates, researchers, and community members from all over the U.S. were gathered in the historic Eisenhower Executive Office Building for the first ever White […]

The International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia, and Biphobia (IDAHOT) is May 17th!

This is a cross-post from our fellow APA blog – GradPsychBlog, the official blog of the American Psychological Association of Graduate Students (APAGS). By Mary T. Guerrant, MS (Doctoral Student at North Carolina State University) On May 17, 1990, the World Health Organization declassified homosexuality as a mental disorder, and since 2005 the International Day […]