Applying Psychological Science, Benefiting Society

Tag: implicit bias

Charlottesville and Us

The White supremacist rally which led to the death of one counter-protestor may seem worlds away from the lives we lead in schools, non-profits, government agencies and corporations. Charlottesville represents the most extreme, virulent and lethal form of racism—a form that is repudiated by most everyone. But racism occurs along a continuum. And the far other end is anchored by everyday acts of bias and prejudice.

The Mad and Unhappy Place of Public Education for Black and Brown Children in the United States

By Dawn X. Henderson, PhD (Assistant Professor of Psychology, Winston-Salem State University) Some of the lines in the classic 1982 song, Mad World, capture the lived experience of many black and brown children in the public school system in the United States. When people run in circles, it’s a very very mad world… Children waiting for… Read More ›

Addressing Biased Policing Through Science-Based Training

This is part of our ongoing series of blog posts about race, racism and law enforcement in communities of color. By Lorie Fridell, PhD (Associate Professor of Criminology, University of South Florida) Do you claim to be color-blind?  Do you believe that you do not notice when a person is Caucasian, Black, Hispanic, or Asian?  Well then, you… Read More ›

“Death by Legal Intervention” by the Numbers

This is part of our ongoing series of blog posts about race, racism and law enforcement in communities of color. By Suzanne Lea, PhD (Fellow, Interactivity Foundation, and Adjunct Professor, University of Maryland, Baltimore County) News of a citizen being killed or assaulted by police, or a citizen who dies in police custody, seems to be nearly a… Read More ›

In Case You Missed It

In Case You Missed It – March 20, 2015

Welcome to In Case You Missed It, a weekly roundup of news articles related to issues of psychology, health and mental health, social justice and the public interest that you may be interested in. This week, we have stories including the widening opportunity gap for low and middle-income earners, the criminalization of children by the school-to-prison… Read More ›

In Case You Missed It

In Case You Missed It – March 13, 2015

Welcome to In Case You Missed It, a weekly roundup of news articles related to issues of psychology, health and mental health, social justice and the public interest that you may be interested in. This week, we have stories including what the Oklahoma University SAE fraternity scandal tells us about Americans’ understanding of racism, new research on teen… Read More ›

In Case You Missed It

In Case You Missed It – February 27, 2015

Welcome to our new feature – In Case You Missed It, a weekly roundup of recent news articles related to issues of psychology, health and mental health, social justice and the public interest that you may be interested in. Why Are Homeless LGBTQ Youth Trading Sex for Shelter? Many of our nation’s homeless youth include… Read More ›

Latex gloves and medical mask with Ebola sign

Ebola, Thomas Duncan’s Death, and the Biopolitics of Disposability

By Akhenaten B.S. Tankwanchi, PhD Although the word Ebola percolated into the American public consciousness over two decades ago owing to an Ebola outbreak in a Washington, DC suburb, it was not until Liberian citizen Thomas Eric Duncan, died from the disease, on October 8, 2014 in Dallas, Texas, that concerns about the spread of… Read More ›

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