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Tipping Point or State of Emergency? Real Talk About Transgender Women of Color

By Sand C. Chang, PhD (Gender Specialist, Multi-Specialty Transitions Department, Kaiser Permanente) and Kimber Shelton, PhD (KLS Counseling & Consulting Services, Dallas, TX) In June 2014, TIME magazine featured Laverne Cox on the cover, the title reading “The Transgender Tipping Point.” The message to the world was, “We’ve arrived.” While the scales have tipped for… Read More ›

Japanese family in the park

ACT in Japan: Bridging Cultures to Help Families Raise Children without Violence

April is National Child Abuse Prevention Month. This is the third in a series of posts about APA’s ACT Raising Safe Kids (ACT-RSK) program. ACT-RSK teaches positive parenting skills to parents and caregivers of children from birth to age 8. Read our first and second posts in the series here and here. By Reiko True, PhD & Nahoko Nishizawa, PsyD (ACT Raising… Read More ›

Sad African American boy

John’s Story: How Racism and Classism Operate Within the Mental Health Care System

This post continues our new blog series on poverty. As our nation reflects on its progress in fighting poverty over the last 50 years, this blog series will highlight how psychology can contribute further to this discussion. By Eric Greene, PhD (Clinical Psychologist) I would like to address the inherent racism, classism and oppressive dynamics which fill… Read More ›

Raster collage illustration of an opened head with cog gears

Toxic Exposure: The Impact of Racial Inequality on the Brain

This is part of our ongoing series of blog posts about race, racism and law enforcement in communities of color. By April D. Thames, PhD (Assistant Professor, University of California Los Angeles) National media coverage of various troubling incidents have sparked outrage and forced the conversation of race relations and biases within the justice system against individuals of… Read More ›

Terrence Roberts Speaks on Racism, Resilience

Originally posted on 2014 APA Annual Convention:
In 1957, Terrence James Roberts and eight other teenagers became the first black students to attend classes at Little Rock Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas. “The nine of us were subjected to a year of sheer hell,” said Roberts at APA’s Committee on Ethnic and Minority Affairs’…

Do Diversity & Intersecting Identities Matter in Mentoring Relationships?

Originally posted on 2014 APA Annual Convention:
I had the privilege today to be involved in a conversation hour sponsored by APAGS CARED (Committee for the Advancement of Racial and Ethnic Diversity) titled “Intersecting Identities in Academic and Clinical Settings.” The program was focused on engaging in conversations around mentoring approaches across diversity dimensions (e.g., age,…

How Can Psychologists Help Reduce Health Disparities in America?

Originally posted on 2014 APA Annual Convention:
It doesn’t seem to make sense: Black American women with college degrees have higher infant mortality rates than the most disadvantaged and uneducated women of every other race and ethnicity, with the exception of American Indians. This is just one of several sobering facts revealed at a Thursday APA convention…

When Our Sisters Are Hurting…

By Alfiee Breland-Noble, PhD, MHSc (Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Georgetown University Medical Center) Karyn Washington’s unfortunate and untimely passing offers an opportunity for us to reflect on African American women, depression and suicide. In early April 2014, Ms. Karyn Washington took her life after what appears to be a long standing battle with depression. This… Read More ›

Man holding sign

21 Microaggressions in Photos

Our fellow APA blog for graduate psychology students, GradPsych Blog, has a great post up about the various types of microaggressions faced by students at university. We have cross-posted it below: By Eddy Ameen, PhD (Asst. Director, American Psychological Association of Graduate Students) Microagressions aren’t just a term you read and theorize about. They happen everyday… Read More ›

Frustrated Latino parents with sullen teenage son

“I Don’t Understand My Children”: Addressing Acculturation Stress in Latino Families

By Carmen Valdez, PhD (Member, APA Committee on Children, Youth, and Families) When many Latino immigrant parents say, “I don’t understand my children!” they are often using the statement literally and figuratively. Many Latino immigrant parents experience a break down in family communication because they only speak Spanish and their children only speak English.  The… Read More ›

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