Applying Psychological Science, Benefiting Society

Culture, Ethnicity and Race rss

We Need to Talk About How Race-Related Trauma Hurts Black and Brown Youth in Schools

Witnessing or experiencing race-related trauma damages the psychological wellbeing of minority youth. African American, American Indian, and Latino youth not only encounter race-related trauma in their neighborhoods but also in school. Schools should be a safe space for all children, but some disturbing data prove otherwise.

Police tape saying "police line do not cross"

Why Evidence-Based Community Policing Needs to be the Norm, Not an Exception

Longstanding tensions between police and communities of color have reached a boiling point in the United States. If we are to heal as nation, we must first acknowledge and move beyond entrenched societal stereotypes that reduce people of color, particularly black men, to suspected criminals who should be feared.

Racial Trauma is Real: The Impact of Police Shootings on African Americans

There have been many changes within the criminal justice system as a means to deter crime and to keep citizens safe. However, research demonstrates that often times men of color are treated harshly which leads to negative perceptions of police officers. The recent shootings in Baton Rouge, Falcon Heights, and Dallas have exposed many individuals and their families to incidents of police brutality that reminds us that as a society work needs to be done to improve police and community relations.

Diverse kids holding hands

How to Talk to Our Kids about the Tragic Shootings in Louisiana, Minnesota and Dallas

Families around the country are coming together to talk about the officer-involved shootings in Louisiana, Minnesota, and the ambush of police officers in Dallas, Texas. These events come shortly after the violence in Orlando. In fact, it seems that acts of violence are in the news on a regular basis. How do we begin to explain all of this to our children when we, as adults, are having our own difficulties with what is occurring?

Postpartum Depression and Race: What We All Should Know

Up to 1 in 7 women experience postpartum depression, a very real and serious mood disorder. Studies show that new mothers of color have rates of postpartum depression soaring close to 38% compared with the 13 – 19% rate for all new mothers.

Islamophobia in the U.S.: A Threat to Justice Everywhere

By Muninder Kaur Ahluwalia, PhD (Montclair State University) and Saba Rasheed Ali, PhD (University of Iowa) A Muslim mom, Melissa Chance Yassini, recently wrote on her Facebook page: Sad day in America when I have to comfort my 8 year old child who heard that someone with yellow hair named Trump wanted to kick all Muslims out of… Read More ›

Tipping Point or State of Emergency? Real Talk About Transgender Women of Color

By Sand C. Chang, PhD (Gender Specialist, Multi-Specialty Transitions Department, Kaiser Permanente) and Kimber Shelton, PhD (KLS Counseling & Consulting Services, Dallas, TX) In June 2014, TIME magazine featured Laverne Cox on the cover, the title reading “The Transgender Tipping Point.” The message to the world was, “We’ve arrived.” While the scales have tipped for… Read More ›

Japanese family in the park

ACT in Japan: Bridging Cultures to Help Families Raise Children without Violence

April is National Child Abuse Prevention Month. This is the third in a series of posts about APA’s ACT Raising Safe Kids (ACT-RSK) program. ACT-RSK teaches positive parenting skills to parents and caregivers of children from birth to age 8. Read our first and second posts in the series here and here. By Reiko True, PhD & Nahoko Nishizawa, PsyD (ACT Raising… Read More ›

Sad African American boy

John’s Story: How Racism and Classism Operate Within the Mental Health Care System

This post continues our new blog series on poverty. As our nation reflects on its progress in fighting poverty over the last 50 years, this blog series will highlight how psychology can contribute further to this discussion. By Eric Greene, PhD (Clinical Psychologist) I would like to address the inherent racism, classism and oppressive dynamics which fill… Read More ›

Raster collage illustration of an opened head with cog gears

Toxic Exposure: The Impact of Racial Inequality on the Brain

This is part of our ongoing series of blog posts about race, racism and law enforcement in communities of color. By April D. Thames, PhD (Assistant Professor, University of California Los Angeles) National media coverage of various troubling incidents have sparked outrage and forced the conversation of race relations and biases within the justice system against individuals of… Read More ›

Contact

American Psychological Association
Public Interest Directorate
750 First Street, NE
Washington, DC 20002-4242
Phone: (202) 336-6056
Email: publicinterest@apa.org