It’s Time to Rethink Our Detention Policies for Immigrant Families

By Melba J. T. Vasquez, PhD, ABPP (Past-President, American Psychological Association – 2011) When you think of the psychological harm that incarceration can cause, what is the first picture that comes to mind? Did you think about an 11-year-old boy who began to wet his bed after being held in a detention facility with his […]

In Case You Missed It

What Makes People Gay (An Update), Ending Solitary Confinement in California Prisons – In Case You Missed It – September 1, 2015

Welcome back to In Case You Missed It (our weekly roundup of articles touching on psychology, health, mental health and social justice issues from multiple news and commentary websites). This week, we address the advances over a decade of sexual orientation research, the impact of post-Katrina recovery policies on Black women in public housing, an end to solitary […]

In Case You Missed It

In Case You Missed It – May 22, 2015 – Racial double standard in Waco coverage, suicide increases in Black children

In this week’s In Case You Missed It (a roundup of articles related to psychology, health, mental health and social justice collated from multiple news and commentary websites) we cover the racial double standard in media coverage of the Waco shooting compared with Baltimore, launching of a new Police Data Initiative, the sharp increase in suicide rates among […]

In Case You Missed It

In Case You Missed It – May 8, 2015 – Worried moms, bullying’s long-term effects and more

In this week’s In Case You Missed It (a roundup of articles related to psychology, health, mental health and social justice collated from multiple news and commentary websites) we examine whether moms worry more than dads, the long-term effects of bullying on children, the lack of second chances that Black kids get in Baltimore, how to […]

Mother cradling her young son

6 Things Parents Can Do to Boost Resilience in Kids

Parenting is hard work. Every parent or caregiver hopes that childhood and adolescence could be a carefree time in their kids’ lives. Unfortunately, this isn’t the reality for many children and teens. Kids without resilience are at risk for cognitive, emotional, physical and social issues as they grow up. Fortunately, building resilience skills to thrive […]

Early Childhood Parent Training: A Vital Tool for Psychologists

April is National Child Abuse Prevention Month. This post is the first in a series about APA’s ACT Raising Safe Kids (ACT-RSK) program. ACT-RSK teaches positive parenting skills to parents and caregivers of children from birth to age 8. The second and third posts in this series are available here and here. By Michele Knox, PhD What do you […]

Young biracial girl staring into camera

A War on Children: The Consequences of Poverty on Child Development

This post continues our new blog series on poverty. As our nation reflects on its progress in fighting poverty over the last 50 years, this blog series will highlight how psychology can contribute further to this discussion. By Roseanne L. Flores, PhD – (Member, APA Coalition for Psychology in Schools and Education) In 2012, over 16 million children – […]

Young girl using tablet

Active, Engaged, Meaningful and Interactive: Putting the “Education” Back in Educational Apps

By Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, PhD and Roberta Michnick Golinkoff, PhD  Are you overwhelmed by the host of stimulating digital toys and games intricately designed to build better brains for the new world order?   As the recent Joan Ganz Coony report noted, there are so many “educational” e-products that it is hard to know which are truly […]

Turn knowledge into action

Moving from Awareness to Action in Children’s Mental Health

By Ileana Arias, PhD (Principal Deputy Director, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) Last week I was pleased to present a keynote address on children’s mental health as a public health issue at a National Summit developed by APA’s Interdivisional Task Force on Children’s Mental Health. Did you know as many as 1 in 5 […]