Applying Psychological Science, Benefiting Society

Is Your Dad Awesome? Tell Us Why

Father's hands cradling baby's feet

Is your dad your rock? Your mentor? Your best friend? If so, we want to hear from you. We’re joining the #MyDadIs campaign to highlight the crucial role that dads and father figures can and do play in the lives of children. The modern day father comes in a variety of forms. Dads might be the traditional breadwinner, the disciplinarian, or not. Single or married; externally employed or stay at home; gay or straight; an adoptive or step-parent. Even when biological fathers are absent, maternal partners, stepfathers, grandparents or other relatives may serve as father figures. Dads and father figures can be more than capable caregivers to children facing physical or psychological challenges. Psychological research across families from all ethnic backgrounds suggests that affection and increased family involvement by dads helps to promote children’s social and emotional development (APA, 2009).

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And the benefits are long term. According to the Indiana Partnerships Center’s State of Fatherhood report, children with involved fathers:

  • Have fewer behavioral problems in early school years and adolescence
  • Form better relationships in childhood, adolescence and adulthood
  • Have superior educational outcomes (graduation, higher education attainment)
  • Have less psychological distress in early adulthood.

Father and daughter

Dads also play a critical part in preparing their children for how to deal with adversity. Kids who are less resilient are at risk for cognitive, emotional, physical and social issues as they grow up.

APA’s Resilience Booster: Parent Tip Tool lists six things parents can do to boost resilience in their kids.

  1. Provide structure
  2. Talk about emotions
  3. Model and discuss self-control and problem-solving
  4. Build their child’s communication skills
  5. Get involved with their neighborhood and community
  6. Work with their child’s care provider or school

Father and son

Clearly, dads are fundamental to raising healthy and well-adjusted children. So, for Father’s Day, we want to give dads the spotlight. Tell us why your dad is awesome by sending us a photo and message on Instagram (www.instagram.com/apapubint) or Twitter (@APAPublicInt) using the #MyDadIs hashtag. We will repost or retweet anything we receive all the way up to Father’s Day – June 21, 2015.

References:

American Psychological Association (2009). The changing role of the modern day father. Washington, DC: Author. Retrieved from: http://www.apa.org/pi/families/resources/changing-father.aspx

Indiana Partnerships Center (n.d.). The state of fatherhood. Indianapolis, IN: Author. Retrieved from: http://fscp.org/wp-content/uploads/The-State-of-Fatherhood-Research-Brief.pdf

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1 Response »

  1. and dad is wonderful He is my hero he has a heart of gold. He is going to be 79 next month and he thinks he is still 40 and works everyday like he is. He helps his neighbors his family and friends. I do not think her has ever met a person he did not like. He is a farmer and a jack of all trades. My dad as I can remember told me he loved me and my children one time but I know my dad loves me and mine. He would give all he has for us. He has taught my boys and husband how to do many things with their hands. He has many grandchildren that love and respect him he has taught him them so much. His great grandchildren think he rocks, he takes them to feed the cows, they know how to pull caves, do hay, work on tractors and other equipment. It never gets to hot or cold or wet for him to take care of his animals and family.

    Like

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Contact

American Psychological Association
Public Interest Directorate
750 First Street, NE
Washington, DC 20002-4242
Phone: (202) 336-6056
Email: publicinterest@apa.org
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