Applying Psychological Science, Benefiting Society

21 Microaggressions in Photos

Man holding sign

Our fellow APA blog for graduate psychology students, GradPsych Blog, has a great post up about the various types of microaggressions faced by students at university. We have cross-posted it below:

By Eddy Ameen, PhD (Asst. Director, American Psychological Association of Graduate Students)

Microagressions aren’t just a term you read and theorize about. They happen everyday to people just like you and me. Buzzfeed has assembled a powerful set of photos about students at one university responding to microagressions they have experienced.

According to Buzzfeed:

The term “microaggression” was used by Columbia professor Derald Sue to refer to “brief and commonplace daily verbal, behavioral, or environmental indignities, whether intentional or unintentional, that communicate hostile, derogatory, or negative racial slights and insults toward people of color.” Sue borrowed the term from psychiatrist Dr. Chester Pierce who coined the term in the ’70s.

Read more here.

Tagged as: , , ,

Categorised in: Culture, Ethnicity and Race, GradPsych Blog

4 Responses »

  1. I’m really out of the loop since I thought universities were one place when this sort of behavior had stopped. I was wrong.

    Like

  2. Reblogged this on Stigmama.

    Like

  3. Unfortunately, colin, I have found that universities are a bastion of ableism as well as plenty of other -isms. I’m talking blatant ableism, like telling students they can’t belong to extra-curricular groups because they hold practices or meetings in buildings that aren’t wheelchair-accessible. Telling teachers they can’t participate in faculty meetings because those meetings are held on non-wheelchair-accessible floors. It’s ludicrous.

    Like

  4. I don’t know a lot about the modern education system but I’ve had similar experiences, although not to do with race, in the workplace. I’m a trans woman that’s also lesbian. I’ve had comments made towards me as people walk past and also women seeing me in the toilets then looking at the sign on the door to check that they’ve actually gone into the right toilets. It still seems that if you don’t fit in with a particular group comments will still be made. Many people still aren’t comfortable with differences.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Contact

American Psychological Association
Public Interest Directorate
750 First Street, NE
Washington, DC 20002-4242
Phone: (202) 336-6056
Email: publicinterest@apa.org
%d bloggers like this: